Brittney Sanchez: Miami as Text

Photo taken of Brittney Sanchez in 2019. Photo by Cristina Martinez/ CC BY 4.0

Hello! My name is Brittney Sanchez and I was born and raised in the beautiful city of Miami, Florida. I was homeschooled all throughout my life until I graduated high school and attended Miami Dade College to obtain my AA degree in Pre-Recreational Therapy. This year I transferred into the Honors program at Florida International University to pursue a bachelors degree in Physical Education: Sports and Fitness. I am passionate about helping people with disabilities, and want to pursue a career that allows me to combine my passion of helping others and my love of fitness and nutrition. I love finding joy in the little things in life like dancing, listening to music, getting to know new people, seeing people smile, learning unique hobbies, and watching the sunset.

Deering as Text

Miami in Miami of FIU in Deering Estate. Photo by Brittney Sanchez/ CC BY 4.0

“A Blast into our Geographic Past”

by Brittney Sanchez of FIU at Deering Estate, 2 September 2020

On September 2nd, we immersed ourselves into an unforgettable hike surrounded by awe-inspiring oak trees and chilling spider webs. We were no longer staring at the busy streets of Miami. Instead, our class took place in the serenity of the Deering Estate. It was not just a lovely sight to see; it was the melting pot of many diverse cultures, an archeological wonderland, a wide array of unique plants, and a wildlife environment which one cannot experience on a typical day in Miami. As I embarked on this journey, I was welcomed by coffee plants, oak trees, strangler figs, and most importantly the untouchable poison ivy.  
The most fascinating part of the Deering Estate, in my opinion, was the influence of the Tequestas. Although the Tequestas inhabited Miami in the 1500’s and are now extinct, I could just imagine them using their shell tools and intermingling with each other as I stood in the Tequesta Cutler Burial Mound. I personally had not heard of the Tequestas until Professor Bailly introduced me to their rich past and unique tools. As I examined the shells which the Tequestas used as tools in the palm of my hand, I could see that each shell served a different purpose. For example, I personally held one that was used as a drill to dig into the dirt. The history that surrounded me in Deering Estate’s nature preserve was an unforgettable experience. Something as simple as holding a tiny tool in my hand, made me feel connected to my geographic past.

South Beach as Text

Miami in Miami of FIU in South Beach. Photo by Brittney Sanchez/ CC BY 4.0

“Not Your Typical Eyebrows”

by Brittney Sanchez of FIU at South Beach, 16 September 2020

On September 16th, we walked down Ocean Drive with a completely different outlook. Although I had been to South Beach’s Art Deco neighborhood countless times, for the first time ever, I got to walk down Ocean Drive without the tourist filled sidewalks and crowded streets. Because of the pandemic, this usually highly populated road was completely empty. This allowed us to have a new sense of appreciation for the architectural history and cultural heritage which makes Ocean Drive such a popular tourist attraction today. In fact, buildings in the Art Deco play such a significant role in our cultural history, that they are not allowed to be destroyed or significantly modified.
South Beach is known for being a prime location for music videos, delicious restaurants, and beautiful sandy beaches. However, most people do not know that the buildings surrounding Ocean Drive encompass a wide variety of aesthetic characteristics and architectural styles that date back to the early twentieth century and the influence of machines and appliances. As I made my way down the street, I looked up at these fascinating structures with their futuristic styles and linear components, and I immediately pictured myself in the Jetsons cartoon. The most fascinating qualities shared by these buildings are the “eyebrows.” Although it might seem like the architect may have forgotten to finish the balcony, these ledges immediately draw you in with their perplexity. Speaking of perplexing forms of art, many of these buildings also display a variety of contrasting relief art. These art pieces can range anywhere from natural elements to erotic displays. I believe each work of art perfectly accentuates the architectural characteristics and cultural heritage displayed throughout the buildings and they each play a vital role in telling their own story.

Downtown as Text

Miami in Miami of FIU in Downtown. Photo by Brittney Sanchez/ CC BY 4.0

“The Influence of the Catholic Church”

by Brittney Sanchez of FIU at Downtown, 30 September 2020

On September 30th, we walked around Downtown Miami and learned about the spread of Catholicism and the substantial influence the Catholic church has had on the world. It is crazy to think that there were no Catholics in the western hemisphere in 1492 and, according to Will Worley, Christianity is the most popular religion in the western hemisphere today. As we ended our walk down 2nd Street, we climbed the steps to what seemed like an ordinary, peach building. Although it might look like a simple building to passersby, once I stepped into Gesu Catholic Church, I was reminded of its beauty. There was a high domed ceiling, countless pews, tall stained glass windows, gold accents adorning the altar, and many saint sculptures around the church. Although many different people from around the world came to America with new religions and ideologies, the Catholic faith remained and flourished quickly. The reason for the vast spread of the Catholic faith can be accredited to the missionaries in the late 1500s. Catholics believe they are called to spread the good news of Christ and these missionaries did exactly that. They went around towns and started converting the slaves and indigenous people living throughout the area. Jesus’ call to missionaries is presented many times throughout the Bible, which is the sacred scripture in the Catholic faith, for example in Luke 10:1-2 where it states, “After this the Lord appointed seventy-two others and sent them two by two ahead of him to every town and place where he was about to go” (“Jesus Sends out the Seventy-Two”). Although “the first Catholic presence in Miami was in 1567 when Jesuit missionaries arrived with the Spanish settlement founded by Don Pedro Menendez de Avila at the mouth of the Miami River,” (“History”) this church continues to have multiple Masses on the weekends and confessions held throughout the week. It is evident that the Catholic Church has made a significant impact on today’s world, and Gesu is a great reminder of that.

Works Cited

Biblegateway. “Jesus Sends out the Seventy-Two.” 2011. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke%2010%3A1-23&version=NIV
ECatholic. “History.” GESÙ CATHOLIC CHURCH was founded as a Church in 1896. https://gesuchurch.org/history
Worley, Will. “What are the largest religious groups around the world, and where are they?” The distribution of religions across the world, 13 April 2016. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/what-are-largest-religious-groups-around-world-and-where-are-they-a6982706.html

Chicken Key as Text

Miami in Miami of FIU in Chicken Key. Photo by Brittney Sanchez/ CC BY 4.0

“We are the World”

by Brittney Sanchez of FIU at Chicken Key, 14 October 2020

On October 14th, we made a difference. “The numbers are staggering: There are 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic debris in the ocean. Of that mass, 269,000 tons float on the surface, while some four billion plastic microfibers per square kilometer litter the deep sea” (Parker, 2015). It is no secret that our earth is filled with marine debris; however, there are moments like these that make the unthinkable facts come to life right in front of your eyes. This opportunity let me take part in making our earth a safer place for wildlife and marine animals so they could live peacefully without being threatened by trash in the bay. You might think to yourself, what difference can one person really make on such an expansive earth like this? Well, on October 14th I learned that a small group of us from the Honors College can make a major difference in just a matter of hours.

It was a bright and windy day in Biscayne Bay. We packed up our lunch, prepared the canoes, grabbed some paddles and life vests, and finally distributed sand bags to collect the debris. Although the water had been completely serene in the morning, by the time we set out to Chicken Key, the water hit the sides of our canoes, furiously dragging us further away as we tried to paddle to the island. To our surprise, our cleanup started even before landing on the designated area on the island when we found a huge barrel which we mounted onto our canoe. Once we landed, we found debris laying near the coastline and on the island. These pieces varied anywhere from hundreds of bottle caps, to large gasoline tanks. After a long day, we collected 6 canoes worth of marine debris. Learning about the effects of trash on the environment and the creatures abiding in it should be important to everyone. We must make a conscious effort to clean up and reserve these beautiful habitats for years to come.

Works Cited

Parker, Laura. “Ocean Trash: 5.25 Trillion Pieces and Counting, but Big Questions Remain.” The numbers add up to trouble for the oceans, wildlife, and us, but scientists are struggling to understand how. National Geographic, 2015. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/1/150109-oceans-plastic-sea-trash-science-marine-debris/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s