ASC Service Project Fall 2020: Skyler Hayman

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 at the Bakehouse Art Complex

Student bio

Hello reader. My name is Skyler Hayman, but everyone calls me Sky. I identify as a non-binary queer human being who was born and raised in Miami, FL and birthed from two immigrant parents who are originally from Nicaragua. All pronouns are welcomed and so are your comments. I am a junior at Florida International University double majoring in International Business and Marketing. Art has always and will always hold a special spot in my heart as it is a way to connect with other human beings through time and space. In the future, I hope to become a product/project manager, but my goal in life is to gain as many memories and experiences as I can.

WHO

An artist by the name of Lauren Shapiro who collaborated with a marine ecologist by the name of Dr. Nyssa Silbiger. Shapiro decided to host her project at the Bakehouse Art Complex (BAC). BAC is an “art deco bakery housing local contemporary artists, with studios & galleries open to the public.” Among these will be an art project called “Future Pacific” by Shapiro. She wanted to raise awareness to the dying coral reef systems. Because the project was so massive Lauren opened up her project to have the help of the local community while teaching them about the importance of coral reefs and how they are impacted by human activity.

wHY

My major is International Business and Marketing which at first thought does not have any connection with art, especially to a project like this one. However, I need to pay attention to the world and where we are and what is/should be the concern of the market. At a reach, this can pertain to my major, and I was told about this opportunity by my professor John W. Bailly which gave me an unforgettable experience.

HOW

Connecting with this experience, in all honesty, took some time. As previously mentioned, my major is somehow connected to this within a long reach, but I had yet to connect my words to my actions. It was while actually molding the clay and adding clay when I was able to submerge myself in this world and have an even wider perspective of seeing the world. Using color, my hands, and a certain reign of creative freedom was such an honor and knowing that the work I was doing was going to be showcased in an art gallery was such a humbling moment.

WHERE & WHAT

Entering the gate, there was designated space under a tent where Lauren Shapiro awaited her community helpers. There were many tables set up under tents where we would sit and work. It all began with picking a rubber mold. There was a variety to choose from with different designs and shapes and sizes. Choose one and then spray the inside with some non stick butter that way the clay could come out easier. Grab enough clay to fill the mold and pick a color, or no color was also an option. This was the moment for creativity since we decided what mold and what color(s). After placing the powder colors how/where I wanted, it was time to press it into the mold and press hard enough to get every nook and cranny in there. Let it sit for a second and then it’s time to peel it out of the mold. Once you have you piece, it is then placed inside a container that has sand at the bottom so that the clay wouldn’t lose its moisture before heading inside to attach it to the actual wooden piece it was going to be stuck to. This first part of the process was repeated until the containers were full.

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 at the Bakehouse Art Complex.

As photographed, here was the giant wooden piece that was covered in barbed wire so that when putting the first layer of clay, the clay had something to stick to. Lauren then explained to us how the attachment of the clay molds were going to be installed onto the wooden piece. We had to score the back of the mold and the spot where we wanted it. The scoring is compared to as scratching the game of tic tac toe on the mold. Also photographed was the bucket of watered-down clay paste that was used as a glue to put the mold on the big piece of wood. Once that was slapped on there, we had massage in the piece so it looked a little more natural. This whole process was repeated until the containers filled with the molds were empty.

WHEN

SUMMARY

Coral reefs are one of the most essential ecosystems of the sea. Coral reefs are the rainforests of the sea in which they provide a home to many species and are also protectors. Lauren Shapiro wanted to tell the community something scary and sad, but had to do it in a way that won’t make people want to ignore the issue while also providing something pretty to look at.

While at the Bakehouse Art Complex, Lauren explained how through art we could tell a story that was going to bring attention to an issue that needed raised awareness about. Coral reef molds, clay, and a lot of teamwork is telling a scary story about how our coral reefs are depleting and it’s our fault, but there are way we can help.

Being able to be part of Lauren Shapiro’s collaboration with Dr. Nyssa Silbiger, was an honor and great opportunity. This is just one of many examples of how science can communicate through art. This time it’s an exhibit about a lost city found underwater using clay, but next time it could be a movie or a painting. This project does not only show how science and art can be intertwined, but how any subjects can come together and still relay a message.

citations

“About Us.” BAChttp://www.bacfl.org/about-us.

“Future Pacific.” Lauren Shapiro, laurenshapiroart.com/future-pacific.

   

ASC See Miami Fall 2020: Skyler Hayman

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 at the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU

Student Bio

Hello reader. My name is Skyler Hayman, but everyone calls me Sky. I identify as a non-binary queer human being who was born and raised in Miami, FL and birthed from two immigrant parents who are originally from Nicaragua. All pronouns are welcomed and so are your comments. I am a junior at Florida International University double majoring in International Business and Marketing. Art has always and will always hold a special spot in my heart as it is a way to connect with other human beings through time and space. In the future, I hope to become a product/project manager, but my goal in life is to gain as many memories and experiences as I can.

Geography

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU is located inside the university campus with Florida International University. Their address reads as 10975 SW 17th St, Miami, FL 33199. Those who choose to visit this museum have the opportunity to see sculptures sitting right outside the museum. Because this art institution sits on campus, it shares a space with its neighboring buildings that are the Hebert and Nicole Wertheim Performing Arts Center and the Blue parking garage, and the Management & Advanced Research building. The visitors of this building can also enjoy a wide variety of dining option on campus depending on the hour. There is also a variety of dining options off campus as well that are nearby.

History

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU actually first began as “a small space in FIU’s Primera Casa building in 1978”. The small space’s collection began to grow along with the programming, the university finally decided that they needed a museum space on campus. This museum is called the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU and resides in a 46,000 square foot building which was actually designed by Yann Weymouth. The museum officially opened its doors to the public 2008.

Mission

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum’s mission is “to provide transformative experiences through art; collect, exhibit, and interpret art across cultures; and advance FIU’s stature as a top tier research university.” In other words, they want for the art that they display to connect us all. From students, to faculty, to other visitors they want us all to relate to the art and to each other regardless of time and space.

Acesss

ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM IS ALWAYS FREE! Due to Covid-19, they updated their hours and how those who are not part of the FIU community can access the museum. Sunday through Tuesday the museum is closed, Wednesday & Thursday the museum is open to the FIU community ONLY, and Friday & Saturday the museum is open to everyone, but those whose who are not part of the FIU community are permitted by appointment only. Those who visit have a maximum visitation limit of 1 hour. If visiting within the last hour, it will be shorter since they have to begin closing up the museum soon. Parking is available for the FIU community within the nearby parking garages, and their is visitor/metered parking that is open to the public in designated areas on campus. The museum is within a 1o min walk or less within the whole campus.

EXHIBITIONS

“The museum presents an exhibition schedule as diverse as Miami’s population. We showcase artists from around the world and across cultures, disciplines, and genres. In addition, the museum also showcases emerging and established local artists in select exhibitions throughout the year.” The whole museum displayed the works of students and other exhibitions that have been there since the beginning of December of 2020.

On the first floor, there was one art work from the “Master’s of Art Education Exhibition 2020” that really stood out to me. This piece is from Grace Cox titled “Natalie, 2020” and it’s a part of a series of hers that contains an important message. Cox was “inspired by what the presence of women in the world of skateboarding means to me” and she wanted to showcase how women these women are “surpassing cultural norms in a non traditional way through skateboarding”, but making sure that the series is “demanding respect without sacrificing authenticity.” I chose to talk about this first piece because it really spoke to me. Am I woman in the skateboarding world? No, but I am an individual who was not taken seriously or even disrespected when I was/am partaking in certain activities that don’t correspond with the gender norms society is trying to force onto me. I see these woman the same way I see myself when I am being me without any care on what the world thinks.

Photos taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 at the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU

I love women. I am a fan of everything they do and how far they have come and how much effort they are pushing for equality. On the second floor, the exhibition of “House to House: Women, Politics, and Place” was not only a collection of art, but a yell that these artist were roaring saying “I am a woman and you will hear me!”. With the iconic song “I’m Every Woman” by Whitney Houston echoing throughout the whole floor, I was able to submerge myself in the history of women and was able to gain an awareness of things of how unfair it still is for women even the “advanced” art world. Out of the whole floor, this piece spoke VOLUMES to me. “Oliver in a Tutu” by Catherine Opie was a true reflection of my own past and my future to be. Growing up, I was an explorer that did not stay within the gender norms. This type of behavior was not encouraged in my household, but this image reminds me that when I have a child I will allow them to be who they are without limitation.

The third floor was an exhibition titled “Tesoro: Pepe Mar’s Love Letter to the Frost“. Tesoro translated means treasure. This whole floor was curated by Pepe Mar who is “an artist who marries a broad range of visual references and personal obsessions spanning art, fashion, queer history, and Mexican culture”. This was clearly seen in every step I took within the exhibition. At first glance, it does seem like a random collage of weird artwork that was painted, designed, and put together by someone on acid. But once you take a breath and begin to take in each piece, the artwork just flows from the eyes the brain and it makes sense. I don’t know why, but the recurring voice I heard in my head while walking through the exhibit was “No, mucho color“. This was my mother repeating her conservative agenda whenever I chose to make/wear something that contained too many colors. All I could do was take in the beauty of the artwork and smile.

special programming

Due to the current pandemic, the museum is not holding any events at the moment rathe than just opening of new exhibitions.

Visitor

Jessica, Visitor, 21

Was this your first time visiting the museum? Yes

What was your favorite piece within the whole museum today? The series on the first floor from Grace Cox of the women skateboarding and knowing that they’re FIU students is a plus

Rate each floor on a scale from 1-10. First floor, 9/10. Second floor, 7/10. Third floor 10/10.

Do you think that this is a good spot for the museum? I like it, I think it’s nice. Although a lot of people don’t know its here. It’s kinda hidden since no one really comes to this side of campus so maybe they just need more advertisement.

Portrait

Jasmine, Front Desk Concierge, 19

How long have you been working here at the museum? 2 months.

What is your favorite piece that is currently in the museum? The three-headed peacock in the Tesoro exhibit, that one’s my favorite.

Rate each floor on a scale of 1-10. The first floor, I’d give it a solid 7/10. The second floor overall a 9/10. The third floor also a 9/10.

As an employee, do you get a first look before they get displayed? No, I can sometimes see them putting them up for display though.

Was it a busy day today? It wasn’t not busy, well we’re not really busy at all to be honest.

Do you think that this is a good spot for the museum? I like it here I just wish they offered free parking. Definitely needs to be advertised more.

SUMMARY

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU is such a wonderful place and an unknown valuable asset to the FIU community. It provides a unique educational experience that unfortunately many do not take advantage of.

The museum’s constant change of exhibitions is a great thing since the people who go love to see new artwork and can get tired easily. The way each exhibition is displayed is beyond brilliant. It’s all about getting the audience to submerge in the exhibits and that is exactly what they do. From the audio aids located in the exhibitions to the color of the walls to the placement of each piece. They all come together tastefully to ooze out art.

The only improvement that I would make for the museum fall within advertisement. LET MORE PEOPLE KNOW! The students who attend Florida International University don’t even know where the museum is and even the most important part that admission is FREE! This also goes with the public. This can also be beneficial for FIU in general to gather more people on campus to this museum. The public needs to know that they have access to this museum and by having more of the public come, it can attract attention to FIU and put us at a more competitive level with the other state universities.

Overall, the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU is an institution I will be talking about for a while and highly recommending those that can come to take the time and gain a new experience.

CITATIONS

Florida International University – Digital Communications. (n.d.). About. Retrieved December 14, 2020, from https://frost.fiu.edu/about/index.html

Florida International University – Digital Communications. (n.d.). Visit. Retrieved December 14, 2020, from https://frost.fiu.edu/visit/index.html

Florida International University – Digital Communications. (n.d.). Events. Retrieved December 14, 2020, from https://frost.fiu.edu/exhibitions-events/events/index.html

Yumpu.com. (n.d.). Master’s of Art Education 2020 Exhibition. Retrieved December 14, 2020, from https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/65060125/masters-of-art-education-2020-exhibition

Skyler Hayman: Miami as Text

Photo taken of Skyler Hayman in 2020 by Judenjy Jean

Hello reader. My name is Skyler Hayman, but everyone calls me Sky. I identify as a non-binary queer human being who was born and raised in Miami, FL and birthed from two immigrant parents who are originally from Nicaragua. All pronouns are welcomed and so are your comments. I am a junior at Florida International University double majoring in International Business and Marketing. Art has always and will always hold a special spot in my heart as it is a way to connect with other human beings through time and space. In the future, I hope to become a product/project manager, but my goal in life is to gain as many memories and experiences as I can.

Deering As Test: “Category Is… Richmond Realness” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Deering Estate

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 inside the Richmond Cottage in the Deering Estate

Fashion is an art form that is constantly changing, improving, and being reinvented.

As seen in the photo above it is an example of what a wealthy woman of those times would consider fashionable. It’s the early 1900’s in Miami and women suffered in heat to be with the trends and seen as a respectable person. Keep in mind that this is a layered outfit with small torso to show off a feminine figure, but at the cost of being uncomfortable, sweaty, and most likely tired.

We now know, that fashion is different all around the world and at times, weather is a factor on deciding what’s trendy and what is allowed to be worn. This was the type of fashion that not only did the Deerings’ wear but was also encouraged for those around them to be presentable too, including the help.

Similarities from those times to now are body types. When looking up fashion from this era, it shows women who have a small waist and a long gown, could be signifying long legs. Models now are continuing this trend by being thin and having long legs. Differences now are that the world of fashion is being more acceptable to other skin colors, but also taking in account of the women that belong to different cultures. Don’t forget that women in general are allowed to show more skin now in certain part of the world.

Overall, having a peak at not only this time era, but also the location, we see they type of culture that was brewing in Miami at this time. The Richmond Cottage was converted into an Inn but not only was it a resting place for people, but also a temporary moment for different visitors to share their differences and similarities in what they wore and their culture from either their part of Florida or elsewhere.

South Beach As Text: “Don’t White People Own This?” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at South Beach

Collage of photos taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 in South Beach

As we begin to go further into our explorations of Miami, South Beach is a place that could never be skipped over. South Beach has gone by and still goes by many names, but the history of the place will remain the same.

Walking through the streets of South Beach and not only was it a unique experience, but an actual walk through memory lane. Buildings have been torn down, renovated, rebuilt, or even kept the same. Seeing the history of these buildings speak through their names and even their architecture.

Having gone through these streets and their history, the string that ties them all together are the white people that have navigated it’s history into the future. Did the big white names actually construct these buildings? No. They have called the shots about who can live there and who can hang out there and exactly where all these things happen.

To this day, the segregated parts of South Beach still continue to be separated. Everything below 5th street is not blocked off and not protected the same way everything above 5th street is. Above 5th street there are blockades that don’t allow cars to drive through those streets which have been places because of the pandemic, but still protect only those buildings. Many buildings have been built in an Art Deco style down this side of South Beach that have kept authenticity of these buildings, but were only protected by another white person.

South Beach today is now the center of Miami, regardless of geographic location. It’s our main attraction that’s placed in the intros of movies and shows, but it is our duty to learn its history which will overall deepen our love and appreciation for Miami.

Bakehouse As Text: “Science But Make It Artsy” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Bakehouse

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 inside the Bakehouse

What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the word coral reef? Did you think of some ocean somewhere? Coral reefs are one of the most essential ecosystems of the sea. Coral reefs are the rainforests of the sea in which they provide a home to many species and are also protectors. Worst part is, they’re depleting and it’s our fault.

So how do you tell the world about something sad and scary, but in a way that won’t make them want to ignore the issue? Art. While at the bakehouse, science was being explained through art and its medium was clay. Repurposed clay was being given the chance to explain science through a story that still being created. Coral reef molds, clay, and a lot of teamwork is telling a scary story about how our coral reefs are depleting and it’s our fault, but there are way we can help.

This is just one of many examples of how science can communicate through art. This time it’s an exhibit about a lost city found underwater using clay, but next time it could be a movie or a painting. This project does not only show how science and art can be intertwined, but how any subjects can come together and still relay a message.

Rubell As Text: “Rubells Take On Contemporary Art” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Rubell Museum Contemporary Arts Foundation

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 inside the Rubell Museum Contemporary Art Foundation

It has been said before that art is a story that each person interprets differently. Aside from being a story. art is a freedom of expression that is used to communicate with people through space and time. So what exactly is the image above telling you?

The Rubell family started with one art work that they were paying with weekly installments to now becoming one of the biggest contemporary art collections in North America. They know that art is not made to be transactions being passed around for one individual, but rather to share with the world. The art works are on display without censorship in their rawest form.

Contemporary art is more of a modern art which makes this museum more reachable to it’s visitors by being able to connect with them. Some art works may seem confusing and hard to understand and other art works look astonishing and beautiful. However, they all fall under the genre of contemporary art because they are from artists living today.

Each of these art works have a background on how and why it was made. Many times artists do not want to provide too much of an explanation behind their work only because they want to leave those consuming it to interpret it for themselves. How do you see contemporary art now?

Deering Hike As Text: “Nature: Where Past Meets Present” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Deering Estate

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 during a hike of the Deering Estate

Aside from the mosquitos buzzing in one’s ear, the climbing temperatures, and occasional breeze, during this hike the past presented itself to its future but our present.

Water in nature is a life-support for all who drink from it. It was a feast for those who eat of its living organisms. In the past, hunters and gatherers would take complete advantage of a place like this one. Not only did it provide a nourishing and thirst-quenching experience, but it also provided them with food to survive until they encounter another opportunity like this one.

Nature provided rocks that were at times perfectly shaped to skin a fish, sharpen a spear, or even dig a hole in the ground. It was nature’s way of helping out the humans in the past. Nature continues to do these things whether or not humankind has advanced far from it. This is where the present meets the past, which is their future.

We now see parts of nature like these or even at times find the same tools they used back then in those places at this time and think how fascinating it is or think how they survive and definitely surprised to how far we have come.

Nature continues to live on in the same way as it used to even to certain animals. Those species who don’t have the power, mentally or physically, to move past the times of hunter and gatherer. We have done damage to these places, but we most also give back to the places who helped us get here.

Downtown Miami As Text: “Dear Tequestas, I’m Sorry” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Downtown Miami

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 during a walking tour of Downtown Miami

Downtown Miami today is the hub to find all different types of people ranging from culture, socioeconomic status, sexuality, religion etc. and it can be seen with the architecture of the buildings, the people walking the streets, and even the type of places to eat. But before all the sights to see, there were Native Americans residing there. They were pushed down south then moved again just so Downtown could become Downtown.

The Tequestas were a tribe like many others that were forcibly removed from many places just so that non natives could steal their land and turn them into whatever they wanted. The history of Downtown Miami is not spoken of much because we are too occupied with concentrating on the diversity of right now. People of color built Miami, but we only acknowledge the ones who were forcing these people to build.

However, houses like in the image above give an exceptional story. An interracial couple lived in that home. A white man was married to his black wife and they had kids and took care of them in that house. Interracial couples seem normal to us now, but were a huge controversy back in those times. This is what Miami is truly about. Downtown Miami itself is a mixture of all different kinds of people with different backgrounds and who have different experiences.

Downtown Miami is even home to other histories. There is a piece of the Berlin Wall in front of the Miami-Dade College that has it’s own story with the past dean. Downtown Miami is a wonderful place that is a very important place for many people. The history of it and those who worked for it to get there is not spoken about enough or one to truly acknowledge and appreciate it.

Mangroves As Text: “Pick Up After Yourselves” by Skyler Hayman of FIU at Deering Estate

Photo taken by Skyler Hayman in 2020 while canoeing in the mangroves of the Deering Estate

This is now my third time visiting the Deering Estate. Every single time I go, it seems like I am stepping into a whole new world. From the Richmond Cottage to the hike trail, to now this. The mangroves at the Deering Estate. The weather was nice, the people were, great and the water was beautiful.

However, like many beautiful things in nature, the deeper you look the sooner you’ll find how humans have ruined it. Before getting to work, we had the opportunity to canoe deep within the mangroves and have a moment to take in its beauty. The crabs crawling on the branches, the spiders weaving their webs, and fellow classmates tipping their canoe. This experience was an unforgettable one.

After some fun, it was time to remember why we were there. This was more than just picking up trash from humans that got entangled within the mangroves. This was an apology to mother nature. We were able to recover a lot of trash that were thrown off boats and somehow got into the mangroves. I was one of the students who tipped over their canoe so I was figuratively and literally submersed within the mangroves. Wet and all, we continued to pick up after others. After our canoes were filled with trash and soaking wet students, we paddled our way back to shore to dispose of what we collected. The only message I can share is, pick up after yourselves.

Author: Skyler Hayman