Allison Vargas: Vuelta España 2016

Allison Vargas: Vuelta España 2016

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Allison Vargas of FIU Honors College in the Alhambra in 2016

ASPECTS OF FREEDO BY ALLISON VARGAS

Studying abroad in Spain with Professor John William Bailly

“I began to examine the different aspects of freedom in the United States and Spain when I saw La Giralda in Sevilla. La Giralda has an immediate connection to Miami because both the Freedom Tower as well as the Biltmore Hotel were inspired by it.”

La Giralda,  a bell tower of the Sevilla Cathedral, includes parts from many cultures. Stones with Roman inscriptions were used to build the original Moorish minaret before the mosque was turned into a church during the Reconquista.

The Freedom Tower, on the other hand, was used in the 1960s to process, document, and help Cuban refugees fleeing Castro’s regime. The tower is now a symbol of hope and freedom.

I found it interesting and ironic that a tower that is the product of cultural and religious conflict is the inspiration for a tower representing freedom across an ocean. However, in the case of both towers, conflict brought about cultural blending. La Giralda itself is the product of cultural blending, while Cuban and American culture began blending at the Freedom Tower. Although the towers have very different histories, they have had parallel functions in the merging of cultures.

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Sevilla’s Giralda served as inspiration for Miami’s Freedom Tower and Biltmore hotel. (Photos by JW Bailly CC BY 4.0)

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

Religion plays a huge role in Spanish history and identity—so much so that it would be illogical, even impossible, to visit Spain and not visit the amazing cathedrals and churches, regardless of your own religion.

The difference in the history of religion in the United States and Spain is starkly obvious: the U.S. has always supported religious diversity and tolerance, while Spain is the product of religious control.

Here is a brief history lesson to explain.

Both the Reconquista and the Inquisition established Christian dominance in Spain. During the Reconquista in the Middle Ages, Christian armies conquered the Moors, and the Moors were driven out of Spain. Spain became united under Catholicism by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, which led to the Inquisition. During the Inquisition (1478-1834), anyone non-Christian, especially Jews, was punished. Later, during the Franco era, Catholicism was the only religion allowed legal status. The government passed laws supporting Catholic teachings, and Catholic religious education was mandatory in schools.

Today, most Spaniards identify as Catholic, but religion has become more of a tradition than anything else. There are still remnants of Spain’s authoritarian religious history, however. Cities like Toledo and Sevilla have a “Juderia” or Jewish neighborhood, although no Jews reside in it. To me, the signs of the Juderia are more like gravestones than neighborhood labels. I personally did not see a single synagogue or mosque that had not been converted into a Catholic church. During my entire time in Spain, I saw only one other church among the countless Catholic churches—a Scientology church.

The lack of religious diversity in Spain stands in stark contrast to the United States, where you may  stumble upon a multitude of different places of worship in any town. However, the U.S. is not impervious to religious discrimination, and it is not unique to Spain. Also, although both countries now claim separation of church and state, religious ideologies constantly permeate politics. In Spain, this separation is difficult, given its history;  but in the U.S. it is notable that religion plays such a large part in a country that has always had a separation of church and state, and that it is even referred to as “one nation under God”.

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SEXUAL FREEDOM

As I have studied in Spain, I have become aware that the level of conservatism is different than in the United States. The U.S. is actually more sexually restrictive, a reality that was blatantly obvious, especially on the beaches.

At Barceloneta and the beach at Sitges, women of all sizes and ages are commonly topless. In the U.S., topless women at a beach would most likely receive stares and even sexual harassment. In Spain, breasts seem to almost be completely desexualized, and toplessness at the beach is regarded as the norm.

Another less in-your-face, but still apparent, way in which Spain is less conservative than the U.S. is the view on homosexuality. I first began to consider this distinction on the day of the Orlando shootings. On that day, the Real Casa de Correos, a building located in Madrid, hung gay pride flags with a black ribbon on them in solidarity. After seeing these flags, I felt proud to be in a country that was standing with American citizens and the gay community. I further noted the difference in views on homosexuality after seeing several gay couples together. Although this is just as frequent in Miami, I did not notice any glares or harsh looks in Spain. These observations led me to do a little research. I found that, according to Pew Research Center, 91% of Spaniards are accepting of homosexuality, while only 60% of Americans are. Furthermore, Spain legalized gay marriage in 2005, while in the U.S., it has only been legal since 2015.

In light of the historical role of religion in these countries, the different attitudes on sexuality are ironic. It is almost paradoxical that a country so dominated by Catholic and conservative ideals legalized such a liberal statute a decade before the U.S. However, it is also relevant to note that the  Pew Research Center also found that half of Americans deem religion to be very important in their lives, while less than a quarter of Spaniards do. Needless to say, Spain’s societal attitudes have evolved rapidly, and in my opinion, for the better. I only hope that American attitudes undergo a similar evolution in the near future.

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A Demon dances in fire at the Nit de Sant Joan Festival in Barcelona. (Photo by JW Bailly CC BY 4.0)

FREEDOM IN CELEBRATIONS

By a stroke of luck, we were fortunate enough to be in Barcelona for the celebration of the Nit de San Joan on June 23rd. I had never heard of this holiday, or what it commemorated, before. My curiosity led me to a swift Google search. I quickly learned that the holiday has pagan origins, and long predates the introduction of Christianity. It is a celebration of the summer solstice, and the Catholic Church later combined it with the birth of St. John the Baptist. Bonfires and fireworks are at the heart of the festivities; the flames are believed to frighten and dispel evil spirits abroad on this night.

Before actually witnessing the celebration, I expected it to be similar to the American Fourth of July, which I associate with fireworks and bonfires on the beach; so when I learned that the Nit de San Joan was celebrated similarly, I imagined them to be alike. Well, it was nothing like the Fourth of July.

There was no part of Barcelona that did not have people out celebrating. Throughout the city, music was playing and fireworks were shooting. These fireworks displays, though, were like nothing I had ever seen. You did not watch them up in the sky while sitting in awe. Instead, they were detonating right beside you in the hands of people dressed up as devils—odd, I thought, for a holiday that celebrates a saint. Although being in such close proximity to fireworks is dangerous, the excitement and thrill in the atmosphere gave me an adrenaline rush that made me completely forget the potential risk.

Participating in this unique celebration really focused my attention on the differences between the U.S. and Spain; a celebration like the Nit de San Joan could never exist in the U.S.; the U.S. imposes too many restrictions! A celebration consisting of fireworks and bonfires would never be allowed to extend throughout a U.S. city. There would be regulations on the beach in the name of environmentalism, regulations on the streets in the name of safety and noise control, and regulations throughout the city in the name of keeping the festivities small enough for the police to control.

What the two countries do have in common, though, is that they have lost sight of the meaning behind their celebrations. The Nit de San Joan felt like an excuse to drink and party, not really to celebrate St. John the Baptist. Similarly, St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. has little religious meaning and now centers on drinking and partying.

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Audri Rodriguez and Yina Cabrera of FIU in Espana (Photo by Vicky Atencio CC BY 4.0)

FREEDOM AND TECHNOLOGY

In no way is either Spain or the United States more technologically advanced than the other, but the use of, and importance placed on technology, is slightly different. Two applications of technology that I found to be unalike when comparing the countries were transportation and cellphones. These two technologies can either be used in society to augment freedom or to restrict it.

Throughout my time in Spain, there were perhaps only two occasions where I used a taxi to commute. On all other occasions, we either walked or used public transportation to get around, which seem to be the more popular transportation methods. This is a pronounced difference when compared to the most common method of transportation back home in Miami: driving.

Transportation in Miami, in fact, restricts our freedom. I can probably count on my two hands the number of times I have used public transportation in Miami, and I am willing to bet that most other Miami locals can say the same. This heavy reliance on cars leads to our infamous traffic problems. People waste countless hours of their lives in traffic, an issue that the average Spanish citizen would never encounter. Spain’s substantial use of public transportation allows for virtually no time spent wasted commuting, as well as an overall more positive commuting experience.

Cellphones are another technology that appears to restrict people in Miami more than in Spain. My reasoning for this claim lies in the observations I made while eating out at restaurants. In Spain, people at restaurants were always fully engaged in conversations with each other, and never on their cellphones. In Miami, the opposite holds true. Back home, it is rare to see people not check their phones at least once during a meal. But cellphones are not the only culprit. Some restaurants in Miami, like Chili’s for example, have tablets on every table that offer games, which further socially withdraw people from what should in reality be a social event.

So when considering transportation and hand-held devices, Spain seems to be doing a better job at using these technologies to improve lifestyles, rather than hinder them.

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Guernica by Pablo Picasso is the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid

FREEDOM AND CONFLICT

There is a complicated relationship between conflict and freedom. Conflict threatens freedom,  but it is also sometimes needed to gain or keep freedom.

Pablo Picasso’s Guernica depicts the bombing of that city during the Spanish Civil War. Seeing this massive work of art at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid was extraordinary; the painting caused me not only to  appreciate Picasso’s one-of-a-kind genius, but also to reflect on what it depicts. The combination of Picasso’s artistry and the compelling meaning of the piece makes it my favorite painting of the trip.

The artwork is a universal symbol warning against the suffering and devastation of war. For this reason, a copy is displayed in the United Nations Building in New York. This fact led me to directly link the U.S. and Spain once again as I researched the willingness of both countries to use military force. I found that three-quarters of Americans agree that it is sometimes necessary to use military force to maintain order in the world, while narrower majorities of Spaniards share the same view. Furthermore, when asked whether their country should have UN approval before using military force to deal with international threats, only 45% Americans agree, compared to the 74% of Spaniards who do.

This difference in opinion may be due to Spain’s more direct connection to the pain and horror of war on its home soil. Perhaps the U.S. is more focused on the use of conflict to foster freedom, while Spain is more aware of the suffering conflict causes.

Melanie Ponce: Poetry, Art Community 2017

© Melanie Ponce

Contrapasso Contrapposto
By Melanie Ponce

Paradiso
We stand together beneath the muffled rays of light
A group of bare kneed students with wrinkled shirts and crumbled pamphlets
Looking ‘round the Kingdom of Limestone
Sweat runs down our backs, the humid air stagnant as we breathe collectively
The smell of salt and ocean mist clinging to our skin
We are the architects of this room, our future
A plethora of decisions yet to come
We hold the collective steps and potential pathways
That will carve our Vizcaya in the coarse sands of time

Purgatorio
The rallying cry of change calls for us
An echo pounding against the white walls
The chiseled figures sculpted by our ancestors
Works of art
Smooth marble
Breaking apart by the sound of our pleas, the stomping of our feet
Shake their foundation
‘Till they break

Inferno
But the marble hid the steel inside
Its structure, the decrepit beams which woke
The ardent stares of those who came before us
Their eyes digging a hole at the back of our necks.
Their cry for change was good enough for them
And everything that we do
That I do
Poses a threat to their lifestyle
To their evening luncheons and art excursions
To their carnival cruise ships and holiday trips to the north.
The old men and women of yesteryear,
Whose chant echoes how our future is in our shoulders but in turn slap our hands away
When we ask for help.
Their backs face us, draped with the cloths of their experiences.
They wash their hands with our sweat.

Originally posted in https://miamiinmiami.com/poetry-art-community/vizcaya-2017/secret-garden-poems-at-vizcaya-2017/

Melanie Ponce: Poetry, Art, Community 2017

Village Garden © Melanie Ponce

Paintbrush from the Past

by Melanie Ponce

Strokes of wet paint glides on a canvas
Pigments from bone
Colored hues whose origins were
Dug from the roots of mangroves and wildlife
They whisper
Through layers of sediment and artifacts
An identity which lies buried in the ground

The foundation of skeletal remains
That braved to touch this land
Mixed tongues and dialects communicate
Through each twist of the wrist and flick of the hand
Of the artist whose job is to mix
Blood and oil
To form a village of dreams

Originally shown at https://peruvianimmigrant.wordpress.com/2017/11/20/featured-content/

Melanie Ponce: Italy Grand Tour Redux 2014

“All Beef, 1983″ by Jean-Michel Basquiat © Melanie Ponce

“A Cultural Analysis” by Melanie Ponce

I have questioned my heritage before. As a child, I have held cardboard packaged lunches at a higher standard than my parent’s cooking. I have pretended my thick accent was an evil placed upon me by the universe. I have acted as if I didn’t know Spanish. I felt that I had to erase my heritage in order to fit the image that I saw everyday. In the television, movies. Everyday, an image that was not mine. So I tried to fit in. And everyone around me tried to do the same. Some were successful. They erased their roots.

But I did not succeed.

As I grew older, I started to appreciate my skin. My voice. The way my tongue can’t wrap itself around certain words. My sound. A memory of my past. Anything that connected me to the country that I can no longer relate to but that I still call home. Too many nights spent under a foreign sky that does not fully accept the color of my skin nor the sound of my voice but still takes my accomplishments and calls it their own. Because at the end, who do I belong to? To the country that I was born in or the one in which I was raised. If the years are now tipping towards the land that does not accept me, does that make me an outsider? If the years back in my land are dwindling, will I ever be able to go back? In both countries, I am considered a foreigner, an outsider. If I belong to none, who am I?
And then it unfolds.

A blast of yellow, of red, of light. Jean-Michel Basquiat, who wrote in three languages to remind you he mastered more than one. Who painted black men to remind you he was one. Who rose above it all despite the odds. I see his art and I see hope. He painted his heritage onto a blank canvas. A theme that we are the same even though we are not treated as such. That this country belongs to us as much as the next person. And I could be over-analyzing into his work. But the fact remains. He was a black man who knew he was black and never pretended to be otherwise. In my eyes that is courage. In my eyes that is love.

He is color, and so am I.

Originally shown at https://johnwbailly.com/miamiastext/pamm/ponce/

Liza Guanch: Miami Service 2022

STUDENT BIO

Photography by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

Liza Guanch is an Honors College student and Psychology major at Florida International University who is currently pursuing her bachelor’s degree. Her long-term goal is to study forensic/legal psychology and find a career in a government agency, preferably the FBI. In her free time, Liza enjoys being out in nature and learning about her environment.

WHO

I volunteered at Deering Estate and Bill Baggs State Park in Miami, Florida. Both volunteer excursions were led by Professor John William Bailly of FIU in the Miami in Miami class. In Bill Baggs State Park, we were also led by Ranger Shane Zigler. Bill Baggs State Park is a Florida state park that protects South Florida’s natural environment, is home to Cape Florida Lighthouse, and is a tourist destination for beautiful, sandy beaches and other outdoor activities. While the original plan was to venture out to Chicken Key, the winds weren’t in our favor, so we came up with the alternative plan of cleaning up the mangroves on the estate.

WHY

While the main reason for completing these volunteer excursions was because it was a part of the Miami in Miami syllabus, there are multiple other reasons. Ever since I was young, I would take part in protecting the environment in any way that I could. I was a Girl Scout for 7 years which allowed me to do a lot of volunteer work that would benefit nature such as beach cleanups with Baynanza, recycling activities, or even something as simple as cleaning up a garden. I noticed that out of all of those, I would continue to gravitate towards beach cleanups or anything revolving the ocean because of how important the ocean is to me. I have always had a deep love for the ocean and what lives in it, so being able to clean up some of the damage that humans are doing to it means a great deal.

These activities do not directly relate to my major, as I am a psychology major, but they do relate to my interests. Along with my love for the ocean, I also have a love for Marine Biology. I considered going down the Marine Biology track in college, but I preferred to keep it as a hobby, so I could have some more room to explore my other interests like legal psychology. Marine Biology is extremely interesting to me, and the mangrove cleanup made me feel like I was making an impact and helping the lives of marine animals, including dolphins which happen to be my favorite animal of all-time.

HOW

For the Bill Baggs State Park excursion, we were told to meet at the Cape Florida Lighthouse where we were met with our mission. It was a beautiful day to be outside with blue skies and a bright sun that shined consistently throughout the day. Upon first glance of the lighthouse, I was in awe, I had seen it before as a child, but learning about the history and how it is the one of the oldest standing structures remaining in Miami Dade County made the view all that more breathtaking. This is the second semester of the Miami in Miami class, but this excursion seemed to bring the class together. Along with connecting the class, I was able to connect with Ranger Shane Zigler and learn about his history, his current responsibilities, and more on his outlook of the park and the world.

This trip to the Deering Estate is the third we have made in this class, but each time is completely different. If we had stuck to the original plan, we would have needed to get to Chicken Key by canoes, but because of the weather conditions and luckily for our muscles, we only had to walk a short distance to get to the mangroves. The first sight that is seen is a blocked off entrance to the old Deering Estate mangrove path which creates a level of mystery and anticipation of what’s to come.

WHEre & what

The Bill Baggs State Park Cleanup took place on April 6th, 2022. We met at the Cape Florida Lighthouse and were told that we were on landscaping duty. The project was to carry several bags of mulch, using gloves, and then lay the mulch all along the sides of the pathway that lead up to the lighthouse. Despite it being April, the Florida sun is no match, and we were instantly breaking a sweat. I was able to work alongside classmates that I had not spoken to much and bonded with them over the task at hand and learned a little bit about their backgrounds which proved to me how doing something good can bring people together. Laying the mulch and making it look as visually appealing as possible took around 2 hours. Once we finished, we stopped and looked at all that we had done and were amazed at the results. It looked stunning. The feeling of accomplishment that came over me when I was able to see the difference, I had made just in two hours was indescribable.

The Mangrove Cleanup took place on April 20th, 2022. This was another April event, so it while it wasn’t as hot as it could be in Miami, it was still enough to sweat instantly, especially with the work we were doing. We met at the Deering Estate and prepared ourselves for the day by putting on mosquito repellent, sunscreen, putting on water shoes, if we had, and gathering the trash bags. Before we started to clean, we learned that there used to a be a path through the mangroves that was about 1 mile long and would lead out to Cutler Creek, but it was destroyed during Hurricane Irma. The mangrove habitat seemed a bit overgrown and while we did find plenty of trash including a metal bucket, some illegal lobster trap materials, and plenty of other litter, we also encountered plenty of spiders and even saw a couple snakes. It was very much an immersion into nature, but that made it all the more rewarding to clean up.

WHEN

Approved/Awaiting Approval hours on MYHONORS

Summary

Overall, both days were a success. I would not have had it any other way. The way I see it, we were able to make an impact and assist in the beautification of our natural world. It is easy to say that what didn’t work on the Deering Estate cleanup day was the weather which preventing us from going to Chicken Key, but it led us to clean another area that needed just as much care and attention. The best part of both excursions was being able to see our results, however I wish we had more time to spend in the mangroves. There is so much to be done there and hopefully one day, that won’t be the case, but until then, the little that we did do went a long way. The only thing left to say is, keep our world beautiful. It provides for us, so let us keep it healthy and thriving. It is the least we can do.


Monica B. Perez: Miami as Text 2021-2022

Monica at the Van Gogh experience near Wynwood. Photo by Olga Rivera/CC by 4.0

Monica Perez is a sophomore pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Florida International University. With that and future schooling she hopes to administer family and dialectical behavioral therapy. With a secondary interest in ecopsychology, she hopes to also use elements of nature and the environment to treat certain psychological disorders. Her current motto is “seek radical empathy” as she strives to understand and share in others’ thoughts and life experiences. In experiencing John Bailly’s Miami in Miami, she hopes to do just that.

Downtown as Text

Dropped Bowl With Shattered Slices and Peels. By Monica B Perez/ CC by 4.0

Beauty Despite the Scars”

by Monica Perez of FIU at Downtown Miami, 08, September 2021

Nowadays, a simple stroll through any large city’s “Downtown” is bound to evoke some level of emotion. The COVID-19 lockdown seems to have left a gaping hole in our cities. Streets are empty, and businesses old and new have been forced to shut down. Downtown Miami is no different. Any native can walk down Miami Avenue and notice the difference pre-and post lockdown. Business is slow, and people carry themselves with heavy hearts missing what was lost. However, the city is not completely lost. A quick visit to some of Downtown’s cultural hotspots shows that Miami has retained her beauty despite the loss.

Lummus park is a public area just oozing with pain, beauty, and history. Upon entering through the green fence, one is met by a melancholy presence that can only be explained by the impressive Fort Dallas. The long, limestone building has seen the dehumanization of black people through slavery and a year’s worth of bloodshed. Just one touch of the rough exterior brings a montage to mind of everyone who has bled, cried, and attempted to keep themselves from collapsing right where one stands.

Just one glance to the left reveals the beauty despite the pain. The William Wagner House is a perfect symbol for what so many world leaders strive for: peace and acceptance of differences. It is so moving to know that the house once held a white man, woman of color, biracial children, and Tequesta people all at once. This is what Miami is truly about. This is not to say the figures discussed were of no fault, but this beautiful moment marked the house forever with light and warmth. The fact that these two landmarks share a space is a testament to how Miami citizens can also share in beautiful experiences despite the pain and loss that COVID-19 has caused.

Miami’s cultural diversity and appreciation reveals itself in Downtown’s public art. Dropped Bowl with Shattered Slices and Peels is a prime example. It incorporates classical Floridian imagery (orange slices) to pay respects to the reason for the city’s founding. The shattered bowl is a perfect embodiment for Miami’s place in the post-COVID world. It is an explosion of cultures and diverse perspectives. Sure, the “shattering” may be painful, but even a scarred city can be beautiful.

Overtown as Text

Stained Glass in Greater Bethel Church. By Monica B Perez/CC by 4.0

“Not just a building”

By Monica Perez of FIU at Overtown, 22, September 2021

Generation Z, nicknamed “Gen-Z”, have a radically different way of viewing the world compared to generations before them. Generational psychologists argue that this is because they were born in a very difficult time in America: the start of the war on terror. They saw the blooming of smartphones and tablets. Most of them even saw them incorporated in the classroom. Most recently, however, they are “coming of age” at a time where political tensions are rising to an alarming degree, and they are charged with the burden of “fixing” the world’s most complex issues: gender equality, the economic crisis, the climate crisis, and racism. Miami’s community of Gen-Z’ers are faced with a unique set of issues that can be explored with a quick visit to Miami’s Overtown, formerly known as “Colored Town”.

On March 12, 1896, Greater Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church was organized at the home of one of the black incorporators of Miami. Today, Miami’s Gen-Z views religion as an institution that oppresses women, LGBT+ people, and ethic and racial minorities. In the time of segregation, however, this church was one of the most empowering buildings the people of Colored Town could have built. In its prime, it allowed black people to worship, build community, and organize protests and sit-ins. There were moments where the building even functioned as a hospital because most had signs stating “whites only”. Churches were not just buildings of worship, they were the backbone of Colored Town.

Today, the people of Overtown do not fear that restrooms or restaurants be labeled “Colored” or “White”. They do, however, face complex issues, like gentrification and displacement. With this and the recent COVID-19 pandemic, the pews of Great Bethel and other Churches in Overtown are emptier than they have ever been. Older members of the congregation that remember the Church in its youth mourn the empty building they have grown to love. Their friends are being displaced, and their projects are underfunded if they are funded at all. Many are tired from years of fighting and look to the younger generation to tackle the problem.

The issue causes discord in the head of a Miami Gen-Zer who wants to free themself and others from the oppression of religious institutions while also combatting the racial discrimination so many have fought to eliminate. The problem here lies in communication (or lack thereof). The older generation is tired (reasonably so), and they do not understand Generation Z’s sensitivity and view of the world. Meanwhile, the younger generation feels unheard and is simply unaware of these issues because they are not being taught in schools. It is important that children are not taught about segregation and racism like they are an evil monster that was fought and simply killed. They need to know that it evolved to become the police brutality, gentrification, and culturally appropriative monster it is today.

This may seem too simplistic or optimistic, but from the perspective of a Miami Gen-Zer, everyone (young, old, black, and non-black) needs to set their biases aside. Protecting churches like Greater Bethel not only protects the building and structure; it protects a house of religious expression, a piece of Miami’s history, and a tight-knit community that has experiences intense racism and oppression for decades.

Vizcaya as Text

Vizcaya Gardens By Monica B Perez/CC by 4.0

“House of Lies”

By Monica B Perez of FIU at Vizcaya, 20, October 2021

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is one of the most beautiful, yet one of the most enraging, places in Miami. As one walks down the pathway to the entrance, one is greeted like royalty by the majestic landscape and the European architecture enhanced by the carefully carved statues that represent the rich culture of the owner’s ancestors. The waterfalls and tropical greenery invite one into the villa, and when stepping in the doorway, the house comes alive. Even the floors pull guests in different directions. Each room is representative of different artistic movements and philosophies. It seems to be oozing with art and culture.

All this makes it much more infuriating that Vizcaya is really a house of lies.

Vizcaya was not always a museum. James Deering started construction of his ocean-side villa in in 1912. As one of the wealthiest Miami residents at the time, he knew he would spare no expense to build a house that would make him look like a god. He “employed” over a thousand Bahamian workers to make his dream a reality. Like the rest of Miami, Vizcaya was constructed by the very people the owners wanted to keep out, and like most other Miami elites of the time, he knew nothing about them or their home. When taking a closer look at the exterior of the house, it is painfully clear he had no interest in learning.

In an effort to keep the “dangerous poor people” out, he wanted to build a medieval moat around his precious home. Despite being warned by locals that the water would drain into the earth, Deering believed he was exempt from the laws of nature. The American prince was not used to being told “no”, so he instructed his “workers” build it anyway. As predicted, the ground soaked up all the water, and he attempted to fill it with cacti instead. Today, mere middle-class peasants unknowingly walk right over the “moat” and get their dirty sneakers all over his marble flooring. This is one of many instances that proves Deering’s blatant disregard of local/indigenous voices and labor.

European culture and artistic movements were lazily incorporated into every room. The interior appropriates French Rococo, Neoclassical and East Asian art styles. This can be seen as appreciation and cultural literacy, but the height of appropriation and abuse falls in the so called “study” and “living room”. The walls of these rooms are adorned with fake bookshelves and artwork of children Deering does not even know. The living room contains the worst atrocity: above an organ (Deering did not know how to play) sits a Neapolitan portrait of the Virgin Mary… CUT IN HALF. Deering held such little consideration for the cultural significance of the work he had in his home that he made a complete mockery of it.

Deering’s Vizcaya villa is the extravagant, historical equivalent of wearing merchandise for a band you do not even listen to. It is the product of a white, uncultured, wealthy, American man attempting to show some ounce of culture. He strung together elements of mismatched and even opposing cultures to create an infuriatingly beautiful fortress of hypocrisy.

South Beach as Text

“More Than Meets the Eye”

By Monica B Perez of FIU at South Beach, 3, November, 2021

South Beach is an embodiment of Miami’s reputation. When non-natives and tourists imagine Miami, South Beach is what comes to mind. One cannot be surprised; South Beach is home to perfect beaches, beautiful palm trees, and Miami architects’ own take on the Art Deco design aesthetic. Most natives picture South Beach as “just another place to go on the weekends”, or worse, “a dangerous place riddled with crime and crazy, drunk, spring breakers”, but they fail to recognize the historical and cultural weight of the area they take for granted.

One of the most obvious staples of South Beach is its rendition of the Art Deco Design aesthetic. It was internationally popularized in the 1920s-30s, and it was brought to South Beach at around 1923. Miami Beach’s Art Deco Historic District is home to around 800+ buildings that include staples like white facades with pastel highlights, curved edges, and “eyebrows”. This unique design makes visitors of South Beach feel transported into an alternate, colorful, sunny universe with beautiful sights and even more beautiful people. Thanks to Barbara Baer Capitman, the district is protected as a historic site, which protects the integrity of the buildings and their Art Deco style. Tourists and natives alike are not told just how important an architectural aesthetic is for an area’s history. For some, it was a way to de-colonize their professions and artistic styles to represent a forward-thinking and culturally diverse generation.

The people of South Beach are what truly make it what it is. It an unfortunate part of Miami’s history is that not every inhabitant of Miami was legally allowed to enjoy every aspect of its beauty. Just like the rest of the country, black, indigenous, and other people of color were not allowed in certain areas of Miami, including South Beach. Ethnic minorities like Jews who today inhabit a large area of Miami Beach were discriminated against in the days of segregation and even after that.

One building continues to stand tall as a reminder of the Jewish culture and faith as it holds a significant place in Miami’s history. The Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU lives in two historic Art Deco buildings that were once a house of worship for the very first Jewish congregation in Miami Beach. The museum holds years of Jewish history in Miami and across Florida. It tells the story of oppressed Jewish communities in Miami and how they were oftentimes refused service at institutions targeted at wealthy tourists. Nowadays, especially on Saturdays, one would expect to see a number of Jewish people walking down Miami Beach to their nearest synagogue for the Sabbath, but many do not acknowledge that this would have been seen as an abomination in Miami’s earlier years. After visiting cultural sites like the Jewish Museum of Florida, one can see this walk as a beautiful victory.

South Beach should not be seen as a Spring Break, touristy, party town for the wealthy alone. It is home to a beautiful amount of cultural and ethnic diversity. It is held together by the black Bahamians and other people of color that built it, the LGBT+ people that entertain its people, and the Jewish people that pray for it.

Deering Estate as Text

Deering Pipeline at the Deering Estate. by Monica B Perez/ CC. by 4.0

“Time to Heal”

By Monica B Perez of FIU at the Deering Estate, 17 November 2021

The modern Miami resident moves far too fast. They are generally unappreciative of the place they call home. They live completely unaware of how incredible their Miami truly is. This is likely because many Miami residents do not have roots that dig very far into its history. One of the most common questions residents are asked is, “Where are you from?”. Many younger residents will say, “I was born here, but my family is from [insert foreign country].” Because of these shallow roots, many natives do not feel as connected to Miami. They do not care to look at a history they do not believe to be theirs. Miami’s Cubans, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans in particular were hurt by their root countries and felt forced to move here. This creates a painful disconnect that makes young residents want to leave.

Residents who do not interact regularly with the Deering Estate may know that it is a museum or that it was a summer home to an old white man, someone they will likely never relate to. What they may not know is that it is a perfect example of what is possible when culture and consideration meet money. It was once a home for Charles Deering and his close family and friends. Today, it is Miami’s very own time capsule. As a museum, cultural/education center, and nature reserve, the Deering Estate holds its own as a historic site listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The area is home to eight different ecosystems that are indigenous to Miami and remain untouched (spare the occasional archaeological dig ). It is a near perfect image of what Miami used to be. Not only was Miami absolutely stunning; it was home to Paleo-Americans (more inappropriately referred to as Paleo-Indians), the first people known to inhabit Miami over 10,000 years ago. A hike through any of these environments stimulates thoughts about what the land was like before development… before “America”. It is important for Miami’s current residents to visit places, like the Deering Estate, that connect modern residents to their geographic ancestors, Paleo-Americans and Tequesta people.

One can never understand what it feels like to be completely displaced–to have ones whole life uprooted and be forced to start anew. People need time to heal and live with that pain. Nature is the solution. Miami residents need to feel connected to the land they live on. Hiking through the raw crevices of the land serve as a direct link to the people that were there before. Though they may not be related by blood, and though some may not have chosen to live here, they are still connected by the land. Instead of dissociating from the land and clinging to feelings of pain and loss, Miami natives need to dig their roots into the rich Miami soil. It is time to heal the generational trauma and make Miami a home.

Rubell as Text

“In Defense of Modern Art”

By Monica B Perez of FIU at the Rubell Art Museum, 24 November 2021

Modern art has long been criticized by artists, patrons of the arts, and non-artists alike. Some say it is not technically comparable to classical art movements. Others say it is lazy, unappealing, or shallow. Some criticize the way artists use it to address difficult issues like politics, sexuality, gender identity, and racial discrimination. Miami residents who feel this way are out of luck. Because Miami is a relatively new community, most of the art that calls it home is considered “contemporary” (ie. made in the very late 20th and early 21st centuries). This means that most permanent museums in Miami will showcase predominantly contemporary art. It is all around us. It is inescapable. More importantly, it deserves more credit than is given.

The Rubell Art Museum, like most other private museums, started out as a family collection in 1965 (when the very first piece was acquired). In 1993, the collection was shared with the world when the museum opened to the public. It is home to over 7,200 pieces and counting and showcases more than 1,000 contemporary artists. An art lover in Miami would not expect to be impressed with the Rubells’ collection. After visiting the Wynwood Art District, South Beach, and the extensive collection at the Perez Art Museum, one would think they had seen all there was in the modern Miami art scene. These assumptions are far from correct. The Rubells have done a beautiful job at collecting and showcasing a diverse group of artworks that perfectly represent what Miami and contemporary art stand for.

The most common criticism of contemporary art is its simplicity, methods, and artists’ perceived lack of technical ability. While these arguments should be welcomed in discussions about individual artworks, generalizing a broad movement is harmful because it discredits the artists and the art itself. Contemporary art is not created to please classical artists; it is not created to please anyone. Contemporary art is the result of artistic expression breeding with innovation because it uses modern technologies to reach a modern audience. It is in direct competition with everything else that takes up our attention: jobs, cellphones, movies, social media, etc. It makes you think. Like authors, contemporary artists use symbols, abstraction, anything they can to tell their stories- stories that have not been told from their perspective until now.

An issue with museums of classical art (private museums specifically) is that most people do not often feel represented in the dialogue. Classical European art often depicts white figures in positions of power while people of color are depicted as evil, less than, or disgustingly stereotyped or commodified (the “oriental” movement is a horrific display of just that). Contemporary art is not representative for representation’s sake. It is representative because re-presents the world in the point of view of the oppressed, the enslaved, and the silenced. Kehinde Wiley’s “Sleep” is a perfect example of this. It depicts a peaceful black man who is sleeping naked with a delicate white fabric to keep him modest. He looks angelic, regal, and delicate-characteristics rarely attributed to black men. It resembles classical (and some religious) artworks that depict white Europeans in a dreamy environment. This piece is not a threat to masculinity, black men, or classical art. It is a piece that represents another perspective on what a black man looks like.

The bottom line is that all art was new at some point. There was a point in time where Picasso and Monet were the newest and “edgiest” artists around. Art evolved just as man did. Contemporary art has its flaws like any other movement. For example, it is easy to exploit consumers by artistically vomiting on a canvas, calling it art, and selling it for millions, but that is not art. It is a disgrace. Generally speaking, however, the movement is just as viable as any other, if not more important. It is a sign that the art world is changing for the better.

Everglades As Text

“Nature’s Wisdom”

By Monica B Perez at Everglades National Park, 12 January 2022

One of the most interesting things about humans is how much we try to separate ourselves from “nature”and “the environment”. We talk about them as if we are not active participants in our ecosystem and cannot change the way it works. The Florida Everglades are one of the best examples of why this way of speaking is untrue. When Henry Flagler discussed expanding his railroad through South Florida, he initially wanted to completely kill the Everglades (or at least most of it). Though his engineers said this was impossible, they (and a few others) were able to change the way water moved through the area by destroying much of it and redirecting the water flow.

It is important to note that Floridians’ coexistence with the wildlife in the Everglades is not “humans interacting with nature”. It is nature interacting with itself. We are nature, and sometimes we forget. People like to distance themselves from nature by antagonizing it.

“This swamp is in the way of my development. I must destroy it in order to grow and survive.”

“This snake wants to kill me. I must kill it first.”

Nature is perceived as an obstacle or enemy when in reality, nature is not in the way; nor does it want. There are ways for us to coexist safely with wildlife, and doing this starts with acknowledging that we are wrong about some things. A quick trip to a raw, natural area like the Everglades shows us that while we are nature, our flawed attitudes have made it so we act unnaturally- out of harmony with the ecosystem. We take more than what we need to survive and confuse wants for needs. The rest of nature is wise enough to check itself and keep a balance. The snake only eats what it needs to, and will rarely overeat or leave food to waste. Plants grow in the water, but natural competitors ensure it does not overgrow.

Because we are able to use tools and develop technologies, we are unlike the wildlife in that we have few natural competitors. Disease and other illnesses are combatted with vaccines and medicines. Natural disasters cannot be stopped, but we have learned to build shelters that stand a chance. We need to be our own competitors and learn to keep ourselves in check. We do this by taking a page out of nature’s book. Take what you need, and keep your wants in check.

In short, humans try to distance themselves from nature when we have a very real role to play in our ecosystem. Our actions have consequences, and if we cannot keep ourselves in check, we will be our own destruction- not “the environment”. There are lessons we can learn from our ecosystems, and trips to natural, protected areas like the Everglades expose us to nature’s “wisdom”. They are a reminder that life is so much more than our wants, it is about what we can learn.

Coral Gables as Text

Coral Gables City Hall Photo by Monica B Perez /CC by 4.0

“The Grey Area”

By Monica B Perez at Coral Gables, 26 January 2022

Over the past few years, society has shifted from glorifying the past to sharing unspoken stories of the oppressed. This is such a beautiful shift because we are finally acknowledging the wrongs of the past and holding people of the present accountable for their missteps. It also lifts up the oppressed and gives them a chance to flourish. However, some criticize those who consider themselves “woke” or socially aware because some tend to hold historic media and figures to modern standards. Both points of view seem to be on opposing sides.

There are ways that we can discuss a figure’s historical significance and admit their wrongdoings. These are especially important when discussing the development of Coral Gables. The construction of Coral Gables started in 1910, when the Merrick house was completed. In the land boom of the 1920s, George Merrick quickly expanded the city to accommodate for Miami’s new wealthy citizens. Merrick and other developers relied on the work of black Bahamians to build most (if not all) of Coral Gables. Their conditions were dangerous and exploitative, and it was clear Merrick had no shame. In the 30s, Merrick advertised a resettlement plan to displace the black population of Miami and move the community across the state. Today, George Merrick is a widely criticized figure in Miami’s history, but are the critics too harsh?

The short answer is… welcome to the grey area. George Merrick is majorly responsible for developing one of the most beautiful areas of Miami. He did this by exploiting Bahamians for the sake of the wealthy. Both statements can exist simultaneously because he existed and did both simultaneously. Some choose to erase his image from buildings or fail to include him in certain conversations for fear of ruining their own image. Erasing him is not the answer to dismantling racism, but erasing his actions is just as harmful. Condemning blatant racism is not “cancel culture”, nor is it holding Merrick to a modern standard. It is actually the first step toward positive change. Sure, almost every rich white man at the time was a white supremacist, but this does not absolve George Merrick of his individual offenses.

Coral Gables is a beautiful community where the wealthy still consist of the major population. It is a town rich in history that is a product of racist ideologies of the time. Walking around the community as a solid middle class citizen of color is strange because you appreciate its beauty, but you know that you would not have been welcomed there 100 or even 60 years ago. It is a perfect example of the grey area where the history, founding members, and even present condition cannot be labeled as good or bad.

River of Grass as Text

“Fleeting Moments”

By Monica Perez of FIU at the Everglades 16 February 2022

Being a suburban, West Kendall kid has its perks. The schools are good, the neighborhoods are safe, and there is a Publix located at every corner. It is every parent’s dream. Sure, the traffic is terrible and gas prices are through the roof, but at least you know you have a safe place to call home. Sometimes, however, the schools get so good that kids stop relying on nature to teach them things. The houses are so safe, kids do not need to go anywhere else to play. The Pub Subs are so good that kids do not need to pick berries off a bush that has been deemed safe to eat from. The kids grow into adults that have responsibilities and bills to pay. They never know what it means to soak up fleeting moments in nature.

Everglades National Park was established in 1947 with the goal of conserving Florida’s natural ecosystem and primary source of clean air. It is home to native flora like mangroves and Florida’s indigenous palm tree. Deer, alligators, panthers, and other fauna call it home. It is threatened now by climate change and invasive species, but nature has a way of adapting with our help through routine burnings and clearing of sawgrass. This is important because it helps control certain populations that may overgrow or make it harder for us to monitor and care for. Sawgrass clearings also reveal solution holes filled with clean, fresh water suitable for a swim.

When hiking through such unfamiliar terrain home to some dangerous flora and fauna, it is easy to feel stuck looking down. While the view is quite entertaining (there are interesting patterns and insects on the ground), one misses everything above and around them. Native birds passing by, the way the cypress trees dance in the breeze, the cloud that vaguely looks like horse with a sombrero- all these moments are missed because the kid who never goes outside decided to take a crazy class that makes her do things she never thought she would do (like hike through untouched terrain with alligators hiding near), so she cannot help but look down in fear. She passes up the chance to swim with her peers (and professor) in a solution hole that will be swallowed by sawgrass in just a few months because she did not want to smell like swamp.

It is so important for people to spend time in their parks to get used to their local environment. It teaches them when it means to take a clean breath that gives life to their body. They learn to feel safe and aware of their surroundings their ancestors called home. It encourages them to eat sweet berries from the bush that nourish their spirits. It gives them the chance to take in the fleeting moments that nature offers them, moments they will never get back.

Wynwood Arts District as Text

“The Ideal Classroom”

By Monica B. Perez of FIU at Wynwood Arts District 23 February 2022

The most common misconception about art is that it is just a hobby and that it has no place in the education system. Many assert that learning about art in any way is a waste of time that distracts from real academic fields like math, grammar, and science. Those same people will say there is no money in an art career or that it is easy, and therefore a useless idea. Clearly, these people have never been to Miami’s Wynwood Arts District.

Wynwood was first established in 1917 as a working-class neighborhood. It remained so until the late 2000s, when Tony Goldman and a few others started purchasing land and dedicating it to modern art in an effort to rebrand the neighborhood as a cultural hub for Miami. It has since become somewhat of a tourist destination and important part of the Miami art scene. Now, numerous collectors of modern art use warehouses in Wynwood to share their collection with the world. In 1999, the first phase Marguilles Collection at the Warehouse was established. Since then, they have used their space to display a wide variety of works from October to April, using May to September to rearrange the art and plan their next focus.

The Marguilles Collection has a close relationship with schools across South Florida, welcoming students from the ages of about 10 to their late twenties. Students attending any university in Florida can even receive free admission to the collection on any day. The Collection sees the value in using art as a supplement to education. Art, especially that present at the Marguilles collection, teaches students about math, physics, history, storytelling, psychology, and even emotional intelligence. The materials being used in certain pieces have practical, scientific explanations for their presence. Certain pieces address important historical events and movements that affect the way our society works today. It integrates different elements of other fields with something that is entertaining, shocking, saddening, exciting, or produces some other reaction.

Art is a crucial part of the human experience. It is what makes us unique among other species, and it should be celebrated. It is also a valuable tool in teaching students about complex subjects. It is important that schools integrate art into their required curriculum and find ways to safely visit museums, private collections, and unique neighborhoods like the Wynwood Arts District.

Key Biscayne as Text

View from Cape Florida Light/ By Monica B. Perez CC by 4.0

“What I Wish I Knew”

By Monica B. Perez of FIU at Bill Baggs State Park 16 March 2022

Growing up in Miami, Florida is one of the greatest privileges I now possess. I have a unique community of people that are similar enough to help me feel safe, but different enough from me that I am challenged in the best ways. I am comforted by the large Hispanic/Latine community here, but I am also presented with people of other cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds that broaden my perspective. One of the communities most dissimilar to my own is Key Biscayne. The island is home to (mostly) wealthy white people who share little to no experiences with me as a middle-class, hispanic person from West Kendall. This has been the area’s steady population since the colonization of Florida due to its perceived exclusivity and proximity to beaches and wildlife. Unfortunately, the stories before this population arrived are told incorrectly if at all.

Bill Baggs State Park is located in Cape Florida viewing Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The park appeals to residents Key Biscayne as a more high-end park and beach. Those outside of the area recognize it for this and the lighthouse colloquially named “El Farito”. The park makes known that the lighthouse was destroyed in the Second Seminole War. Historians will depict this day as a savage attack by uncivilized “Indians”. Even the images surrounding the park suggest this, but the Seminoles carried out a skillful, calculated attack that left only one survivor. In addition, the park provides information about how the park was a checkpoint for the Underground Railroad. Local schools, however, prefer to keep this information quiet to distance Miami from slavery, the Underground Railroad, and any signs of racism.

As I mentioned before, Miami is a diverse community that includes people of all shapes, sizes, and colors. However, schools are not doing the best job at making sure accurate local history is being taught. So many believe that the answer to the most complex racial and discrimination issues is erasure and re-writing. Erase lessons about how Miami was (and still is) a part of “The South”, which encouraged slavery and racial injustice. Re-write the Seminole people as inferior. The best way to alleviate the pain is to educate. As a Miami-raised college student in 2022, I wish I had known more about my local history, including that of Key Biscayne.

Coconut Grove As Text

Plymouth Congregational Church/ Photo by Monica CC by 4.0

“Many Perspectives”

By Monica B. Perez of FIU at Coconut Grove 30 March, 2022

A native “Miami-an” would categorize Coconut Grove to be “that place with no parking and lots of expensive restaurants”. It is a place where the lower-middle class goes to experience luxury, and only the upper class can stay the night. However, Coconut Grove is also home to a historically significant Bahamian community, groundbreaking faith communities, and nationally-recognized green spaces. It holds a surprisingly wholesome bit of Miami’s complicated history. Learning about Coconut Grove is essential to a well-rounded education on Miami’s history because it highlights so many different perspectives.

One of the most moving parts of Coconut Grove is the historic Bahamian community. Most educated “Miami-ans” know that there was a significant Bahamian population before white settlers colonized Florida and developed Miami Dade. This original community, neglected in the census, was responsible for actually building most older neighborhoods in Miami because they were the ones who best knew how to manipulate materials like oolite and limestone. Those honorable people now lay in a Bahamian-style cemetery that keeps their legacy alive. This style cemetery is so different from most North-American cemeteries that it inspires certain artists to replicate it as a setting for productions.

As with any other community in any part of the world, a great way to learn about Coconut Grove is to visit the different faith communities. Christ Episcopal Church, founded March 24, 1901, tells the story of the community because it represents it on their stained glass windows. Contrary to many Christian Churches that depict predominantly white figures, Christ Episcopal Church depicts significant characters in the bible, like Jesus, as black. This better immerses the community in the faith because they can see themselves represented on the walls. Plymouth Congregational Church, organized November 7, 1897, represents the land in the materials used to build it. The stone used to build it was gifted by a member of the community and sourced from Coco Plum Plaza. It is art and function created by hand, from the land it sits on.

The Barnacle was built in 1891 by Ralph Middleton Munroe, a middle-class, blue collar worker from Staten Island, New York. He built his house away from the developing city to maintain a “simple and genuine life”. Even today, few cars are allowed in the park, and little city noise can be heard from inside. The house is well known across the country for being built from the top down. The roof had been modeled similar to a boat (due to Munroe’s occupation), the second story was originally the first story, and the whole house was picked up using railroad jacks to build a first floor. Deemed a Florida Heritage site, it is a beautiful example of a hard-working, simple gentleman calling Miami his home.

Liza Guanch: Miami as Text 2021-2022

Photography by Liza Guanch//CC by 4.0

About Me

Liza Guanch is a 19-year-old junior at Florida International University. She was born and raised in Miami but embraces her Cuban and European background. She is a cancer survivor and sees that as one of the blessings in her life. She is majoring in Psychology and wants to pursue a graduate degree in Forensic Psychology to then work in the FBI. She continues to challenge herself to accomplish all her goals and learn every piece of knowledge she is able to.


Downtown as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Roots of the City as Text”

by Liza Guanch of FIU at Downtown Miami, 1 September 2021

Color can be found deep within the roots of Miami. However, it seems that this story of color has been washed out. The original inhabitants of Miami were colored, the Tequestas. The first named citizen was a colored man, a Bahamian. The first buildings to be built in Miami were created by African-American people. Miami runs on color, but with so much of the history that is told being based on the European colonization, it gets pushed underground.

To be colored in a society that was crafted by those who were colored should be something powerful, yet it has brought so much fear and struggle instead. In the beginning, the Tequesta people brought life to this city prior to it being a city. They used their knowledge of the land that they called home to survive 250 years past European colonization. They passed on many skills and lessons to these foreigners such as farming in this wet environment and hunting methods to get the best catch in the Miami wild. Without these skills, the foreign Europeans would not have lasted long. Yet, somehow, the foreigners decided that these Tequestas were of no use as the years went on and ran them out leading to their extinction. Miami may have been inhabited by color, but it then became a European settlement.

As the Europeans continued to take over the land we know as Miami, a man by the name of William English came from the Carolinas to create a civilization based on fertile soil. While this can be seen as good, all good brings on its fair share of bad. To take care of this land, labor was needed, and what better labor, English thought, then free labor. Slave labor was introduced because of civilization creation and agriculture in Miami. The first buildings ever built were slave quarters, “Longhouse” which then turned to “Fort Dallas” to be used in the Seminole Wars, and they were built by the African-American and Bahamian people. While slavery may have started because of William English, the foundation of Miami being built by color was also started.

Further understanding of Miami roots running deep and filled with color are the Seminole Wars. These three wars paved the way for the Seminole Indians to have the home that they have now in the Everglades. These wars were some of the most gruesome wars on both the European and the Seminole sides. While they were the most gruesome, the end result was freedom for the colored people, despite them still being pushed into the Everglades. The colored roots of Miami may run deep and may be underground in most parts, but the Seminoles prove that these roots are present and are never-ending.

As the creation of Miami continues, Henry Flagler brings railroads to Miami which is an extreme improvement to the city that Julia Tuttle founded. However, these railroads allowed for town separation which Flagler took advantage of and created segregation among Miami through the development of the city we know as “Overtown”, but was known as “Colored Town” and referred to as “Darkie Town”. This was the first appearance of segregation and continues to prove that despite Miami being crafted and built by color, there is more fear and struggle than power and freedom in these colors because of its European history.

As time goes on, segregation eventually ends in the 1900s, but the divide never disappears. Racism dates back to the early 1700s-1800s when the Europeans first came to interact with the indigenous people and any other tribes that made their presence known such as the Seminoles and Tequestas. Racism does not limit itself to only the African-American people, it extends to those of all color, and it does not leave color out. It is a prevalent issue that still exists today which is a deep shame because this city would not exist if not for color. Our roots are color, we were built because of color, the society we know today would not be if not for color. Our roots run deep and they are colored.


Overtown as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Racing Time”

by Liza Guanch of FIU at Overtown, 15 September 2021

Time. We know it as the seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, and years of our lives. We see it as a wake-up or go to sleep reminder, we see it as class/work start and end times. In present day society, many simply see time as a concept that helps our day-to-day lives. The reality is time is not just an aiding concept. Those of us who do not see time in this “present” view are those who have been at war with it, those such as the Tequesta tribe and other Native American tribes or the lively community that was forcibly created in Overtown who have suffered so greatly at the hands of this unbeatable force.

The beginning of this fight in Miami against time starts with the Tequesta inhabitants, the Miamians before Miami. This tribe and a few others such as the Seminoles and Miccosukee found the area of what is now known as Hialeah as a place to farm because of its fertile grounds, but it was also used as time went on with those newer Miami people. As time passed, the Tequesta went extinct after 250 years of living alongside foreigners, the Seminole people fought for their land and never surrendered but were forced to move to the Everglades where they presently reside. Time forced these inhabitants out of Hialeah, so a city could be built, as if a community was not ruined. Hialeah Park was created as time passed and it became the center of Hialeah in the 1920’s standing as a family friendly location to bet on horse races and greyhound races. This seemed wonderful and it lasted for several years leading up to the late 1990’s/early 2000’s, but again, time passed meaning that laws were passed, and those laws include gambling and animal cruelty laws which shut down horse and greyhound racing; this led to the eventual shut down of the Hialeah Park amusement area and it is now seen as a protected piece of history. While the loss of business in Hialeah Park is not as much of a loss as what the indigenous people faced, it is still a clear example that the more time passes, the more life can be altered in so many significant ways.

One of the most saddening challenge that has been faced with time is portrayed in Overtown. This city was created to segregate the Blacks from the Whites during the time of Henry Flagler and was known as “darkie town”, so these people of Overtown were forced to create a community out of this area and they did. They made the most out of this forced lifestyle and even developed a business sector and a “Little Broadway” which is where the city would come to life with the constant performances from big name Black celebrities such as Billy Holiday, Aretha Franklin, and Count Basie among others. As the enemy known as time continued to terrorize life as they knew it, developers came and decided that many buildings, homes, and areas needed to be updated to give Overtown more appeal. If you view Overtown today, it is filled with high-rises including excessively expensive apartment buildings and there is a highway, I-95, that sits around 50 ft from one of the first historically Black churches in Miami. This is called gentrification. Gentrification is dislodging a community to try and create a different image for the city, despite the city already being beautiful and filled with passion. All those high-rises were once family homes and businesses that were forced to move because developers decided they had a better plan for that one specific area which overruled having to uplift so many families and hard workers from the only places they knew as theirs. The only buildings left from this massive development are mainly the ones that must be protected by the National Register of Historical Places such as the two historically Black churches, the Dorsey house, and the Lyric Theatre. These churches still have services to this day where they speak on all the good the Lord has provided them with, yet they are still made aware every day of all that has happened leading up to present times. They never forget the effect that time had on them and continues to have on them. While time may bring some good, we can never forget that we are always racing time.


Vizcaya As Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Ignorant Pleasure”

By Liza Guanch of FIU at Vizcaya, 13 October 2021

Ignorance is bliss. Bliss is defined as perfect happiness or an immense level of joy. What brings on bliss during times of struggle? Pleasure. People crave to be pleased and to please because of the satisfaction it brings despite any issues they may be facing. James Deering, one of the wealthiest men in Florida in the late 1800s to early 1900s, desired a lifestyle filled with this concept. He enjoyed traveling and experiencing all the world had to offer, but he was enamored by Italian living. As he was planning his next expedition to Italy, World War I struck preventing him from doing so. What does a man who longs to be entertained and pleased do when he is kept from his place of enjoyment? Naturally, a man like Deering would bring Italy to Miami, Florida.

Deering not only brought Italy to Florida, he brought Europe as a whole to Florida during his creation of Villa Vizcaya, an Italian-style villa made to represent pleasure and entertainment. He hired Paul Chafin as an artistic director to bring his ideas to life in this villa. To provide an idea of what Deering wanted to have on display in his villa, one has to understand that despite wanting to create a theme of indulgence, he also had to have anything that was new in technological advancements or that showcased his wealth such as a phone which he primarily used to contact his brother, Charles Deering at the Deering Estate, and an organ in one of the rooms.

Villa Vizcaya was created amongst the 180 acres of Bayfront land that Deering purchased, but it only makes up about 38,000 feet and Vizcaya Museum only consists of 50 acres to date. Deering made it a point to buy this much land but only build on such a small portion in comparison to be able to preserve the natural environment. The creation of this villa took about 4 years and utilized 10% of Miami’s population at the time with most being Afro-Caribbean, black laborers that were paid more at Vizcaya as opposed to any other job they were able to get yet it was still nowhere near a stable living for these laborers. While Deering may have been an avid nature conservationist, he remained blind to the main issues at hand such as racism, prohibition, and many others. Some would say that his wealth blinded him, but being ignorant comes from only viewing the world in a singular view, and in his case, it was his hedonistic view that shut out any that would impact it negatively— though, I suppose wealth could also play a part in this. His ignorance might have prevented him from being involved in society and using his wealth for more than just self-satisfaction, but Deering never seemed to create any label for himself that would place him as a vile person, just possibly overcome by his status.

Deering believed himself to be made up of many different personalities. He believed he was an adventurer, a pioneer, and a hero to name a few. He crafted statues of Ponce De Leon and a man from the Vizcaya shipwreck which he placed across from each other on the grounds to showcase who he thought himself to be. Throughout his villa, many representations show his egotistical view of himself in several ways, but there are also many depictions of ecstasy and indulgence such as the statue of the Roman God of Hedonism, Dionysus, the statue of Leda who had relations with a swan that was Zeus in disguise, or the music room with “Cupid” seen on the walls and ceilings and floral patterns seen in the light fixtures, furniture, and walls representing the female anatomy in art.

Deering crafted a beautiful villa with representations of Spain, Italy, France, and Rome in the architecture and design. The villa immersed visitors in a trip around the world that satisfied all of their visual needs and allowed them to be consumed in pleasure and blind to reality. With secret garden hideaways, breath-taking pieces of artwork, stunning natural landscaping, and hedonistic symbols throughout the property, Vizcaya lives up to Deering’s goal of being a place of pleasure. Living in ignorant pleasure may not be suitable for day-to-day life in present times, but if there is a chance to experience it for a moment and escape true reality, then that is a chance worth taking.


South Beach as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch//CC by 4.0

“Diversity and Design”

By Liza Guanch of FIU at South Beach, 27 October 2021

Diversity is defined as the quality of including people from different ethnic, religious, social, and racial backgrounds along with those of different genders and sexual orientations, so how is there diversity in design? South Beach has not always been known as a place filled with unique architecture, as it was once a mangrove-filled habitat that transformed into a getaway beach paradise for those of all colors. However, as time progressed, diversity was strained until design in architecture decided to take over which allowed for a grand re-opening of a shared city.

There are three main architectural designs that South Beach is filled with: Mediterranean Revival, Mimo, and the most famous, Art Deco. Mediterranean Revival comes from Spanish and Mediterranean influences and is known for creating an atmosphere of relaxation and serenity; identifying this style involves looking for archways, porches, balconies, and iron fixtures much like the Versace mansion. This form of architecture can be found throughout South Beach and was introduced to Miami in the 1920s-1930s to entice tourists and add an “exotic” appeal. Mimo is the second style found throughout the architecture in South Beach and stands for Miami Modern. It was developed in the post-war period and was meant to fulfill the intrigue of people’s fascination of futurism with acute angles and other geometrical forms. Last, but not least, is Art Deco, which by itself can stand to represent the beauty and symmetry of the diverse and tropical city that we live in. Art Deco first began in France just before World War I and is where the name was founded, but it made its appearance during the design period of the 1920s and 1930s which is when the other styles began to emerge as well. This movement was a strong influencer and motivator to more than just building styles, it inspired fashion and art as well. These buildings are not easy to miss and that was intentional as the goal was to create a modern look that was simple, yet fresh. Noticeable features of these Art Deco buildings are their bright colors, their porthole style windows, the symmetry of “three”, and the detailing that is usually of geometric shapes or of nature.

These three design styles may only be buildings, but they are creations of different backgrounds that serve as a destination for all to view, therefore increasing diversity in and through design. It may not make total sense, but Miami often does not, yet the chaotic nature of this city is what helps it thrive. We are diverse and beautiful in every sense of the word.


Deering Estate as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Dangerous Beauty”

By Liza Guanch of FIU at the Deering Estate, 10 November 2021

The Deering Estate is made up of over 450 acres of natural Miami landscaping. It was once the home of the Tequesta people and is still the home of many animals such as gopher tortoises, river otters, spiders, snakes, coyotes, and many more. There is so much history that is found within the roots of the mangroves, within the bark of the tree, and within the holes of the earth. Even the extinct Dire Wolf ran across the prairies that made up the land that is now the Deering Estate.

Step into the past. The roots run deep here. Imagine you are a foreigner because that is what you are in this terrain. The mosquitoes flying at full speed like fighter jets just to get a taste of your sweat-covered body, coyotes howling in the distance, unknown steps being taken into mangrove-filled freshwater that can house all from alligators to snakes to the tiniest of insects, the beautiful danger is all around. You discover several holes on your trek through this wilderness, some are solution holes, some are the doings of the animals around you such as the crab, but all are not meant to be stepped in with their varying depths, they are threats that contain history that is not meant to be disrupted. The type of history that is found here is the type that tells stories. From animals being trapped in the deep holes that they just went in for a sip of water, but never lived to drink anymore as they were devoured themselves to human remains that were buried as part of a ritual. This is a land of many stories. A land of several habitats and homes. This is not a foreigner’s land, but it welcomes it with all its dangerous beauty. This is and was the true Miami.

Being able to preserve this part of Miami is crucial because it helps remind us of our roots. It helps archaeologists better understand our roots. It helps the mangrove roots survive and continue to spread, providing a better environment for everything. Our roots run deep and the Deering Estate is proudly preserving them.


Rubell as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Immersive Experience”

Modern art and contemporary art define two versions of artistic style. Contemporary art usually refers to current artwork that is thought-provoking and creates an emotional response, whereas modern art is about the medium being used which began with a simple painting but has evolved into using any and every material for creation. Combine these two styles together and you have Modern Contemporary Art. A style that contains art done with all imaginable items such as wood, plastic, oil, fur, or something as simple as a pencil and some paint. Modern Contemporary Art is a style that uses multiple resources to create the final piece which often tells a story or can create one by touching on sensitive topics such as societal issues. Some say that these pieces of work are a conversation between the creator and the piece, itself, but I believe that the piece stands as a message man for the creator who is screaming their message across in immersive and abstract beauty.

“Where the Lights in My Heart Go”- Yayoi Kusama Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

At the Rubell Museum, there is a constant flow of artwork traveling through from over 1,000 artists. The latest and most featured exhibit are the works of Yayoi Kusama. Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese artist who had spent the past 40 years being a voluntary patient in a psychiatric hospital due to severe hallucinations and panic attacks that stem from childhood trauma among other situations she has encountered.  She has lived through a series of events and depicts that in her art. It seems that she is insistent on making her work come to life to tell her story, as any contemporary artist would, but she does this to a deeper level. Her artwork takes you places, it takes you to other worlds, and immerses you in her headspace, into her creations. She has been creating ever since she was a child, detailing her trauma, her loss, her suffering, her lessons learned, all through the medium of artwork. Knowing her intention and background significantly affects how her art is viewed, but without that knowledge, her artwork is incredibly powerful and speaks for itself. A personal favorite is “Where the Lights in My Heart Go”, it is a piece that immediately drew me in and a piece that I developed a connection with. This piece reminds me of a city of stars and being lost in the light. I was instantly overwhelmed by the beauty of it and wish I had more time to spend inside of this art installation, but it created a lasting memory in my brain. It told a story of being caught in a never-ending world and how it is so easy to be caught up in the endless and all-consuming side of it, but the constant rays of light show that while it may be endless, it is also beautifully lit up and filled with extraordinary moments. It is safe to say that Yayoi Kusama has successfully mastered the art of immersive experience and I hope that she continues to tell her stories and allow others to create stories of their own with her work because it is truly captivating.


Everglades as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“An Alligator’s Oasis”

The Everglades is made up of 1.5 million acres of natural landscape from saltwater marshes to pine rockland. Within this vast amount of land, there are several species of animals and plants, but the alligator holds the spot as the most well-known. Alligators are perceived as dangerous creatures and their level of violence has been exaggerated through the years. This is not to say that they are not strong and ferocious creatures, they are, but they usually prefer to keep to themselves. They have a unique lifestyle, and the Everglades acreage is perfect for it.

It is common to see alligators in groups, or congregations, basking in the sun, but alligators do not actually spend all their time in this groups. They enjoy their privacy and time has taught them a solution to this. One of the nicknames that alligators have is “engineer” and this is because of their ability to create. These reptiles have mastered the art of construction within nature. They construct massive homes for themselves that define serenity. These homes are known as “alligator holes” to people, but a proper name would be “alligator’s oasis”.

Upon entering an alligator hole, a feeling of peace immediately takes over. It is a creation unlike any other. The alligator hole from the outside looks like a simple hill, but within, it is made up of so much more. Water covers the ground with depths usually being around 2-3 feet all around, but there are deeper spots throughout. Massive trees are spread out all over the land with small spots of dry land that provides just enough room for an alligator to relax and a large opening in the center of the hole to let all possible natural light enter. The beauty in this hole is surreal. The alligator’s oasis is not just for the alligators, as owls and other species have been seen enjoying their own moment of serenity.

Alligators may not be human, but they understand the importance of having a place of peace that helps escape reality. These reptilian engineers craft nature’s 5-star resorts and it is truly impressive. Once one enters this oasis, leaving becomes a challenge because there is no place on earth that is as quiet, as serene, or as beautiful, as the alligator hole.


Coral Gables as Text

“Step into the City”

The city of Coral Gables opened in 1906 and was founded by George Merrick. Merrick’s name is controversial to some, as he used Black laborers for much of his construction, but he remains a man who crafted a successful city, despite how many attempts there are at erasing his name in history. A major highlight of his success is the Biltmore hotel.

The hotel was originally created by Merrick as a place for his new landowners to stay while they awaited the completion of their new homes in Coral Gables, but it became more than that. It became a hot spot for entertainment and fashion. It opened in 1926 with 400 hotel rooms, an 18-hole golf course, beautiful views, and designs crafted in Merrick’s vision of beauty which was of Arabic and Mediterranean style. During the years leading up to World War II, the hotel was hosting major events and housed several celebrities and exclusive individuals from royalty to Al Capone. It was also during these years that the Biltmore overcame the economic downfall that was occurring by using the pool that was the largest pool in a resort at the time for aquatic events from alligator wrestling to synchronized swimming.

World War II changed the Biltmore from an exhilarating tourist destination to an army hospital. This is where many haunted stories of Coral Gables began due to the many deaths that have occurred during the years of the war. It remained a hospital until the late 1960’s and then was owned by the city but left abandoned for about 10 years. These 10 years involved endless amounts of trespassing teenagers looking for ghosts, specifically the lady in white who jumped out of the balcony window in hopes of saving her son and while she managed to save him, her spirit is said to be trapped in the Biltmore; alternatively, these trespassing teens could have simply wanted an exciting adventure.

Around the early 1980’s, the Biltmore began a major restorative process to reopen as a hotel. It opened after 4 years, remained open for 3, and closed again for another 4. Another attempt was made to restore this hotel to its natural beauty and elegance and this attempt took 10 years but exceeded expectations. It is a National Historic Site and is an expensive landmark that has tourists flying in from all corners of the world. Going to the Biltmore may seem like an escape from reality and into royalty, but it really is a step into the city of Coral Gables and a step into history. The Biltmore was crafted by Merrick and will be forever known as the place made for the city. It will also be known for its haunted history, so feel free to stop by for a ghost tour and a day at the pool.


River of Grass as Text

Absent from this excursion; photo is from previous Everglades excursion// Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Everglades Defense”

Stepping foot in the Nike Missile Base is taking a step into history. From the dog kennels to the missile itself, it is 100% authentic and preserved. This site was finished in 1965 and served as protection to air attacks that could occur from the Soviet Union as this was in the middle of the Cold War. This war was the result of an ongoing political rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States post World War II; the reason for the name is because neither officially declared war which means they never fought directly, as opposed to a “hot war” where nuclear weapons can destroy. With this knowledge, it can be understood that the missile sites that were created all over the United States served a purpose of protection; it can be called a “just in case” measure.  

The Nike Missile Base in the Everglades is called “HM69” or “Alpha Battery”. It was a part of a project called Project Nike (Nike being the goddess of victory in Greek mythology) that involved setting up these sites around the country in efforts to protect U.S grounds from Soviet air attacks. The Everglades was not a major city, but it was at a perfect location because it was on watch for attacks in the South, or rather from Cuba which was a Russian hotspot at the time. This specific location housed 2 missiles with extensive technological advances that allowed for a better defense of South Florida. During the time it was in use, it was home for over 140 soldiers, and they stood as the manpower behind the missiles. In my opinion, the most interesting remnant of this site is the dog kennel because if this was a site to prevent air attacks, the purpose of the canine’s presence other than companionship is unknown to me.

However, this site was not used; the soldiers who made up the staff of this site were given an “Army Meritorious Unit Commendation” for its deterrence ability rather than attack. Overall, this historical site is an impressive location that deserves continuous recognition for the part it played in the war and the protection it gave to the Everglades and all South Florida.


Design District as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“The Art of Giving”

Art is powerful. It can take on many forms and meanings. An artist’s mind is almost as powerful, as it creates the ideas behind the pieces. An artist’s work is a way of storytelling, and it is an extension of themselves. These stories in these pieces speak volumes and they need to be heard.

In both the Margulies Collection in Wynwood and in the De la Cruz Collection in the design district, there was art that immediately immersed its viewers, but Felix Gonzalez-Torres was the most intriguing of all. His work is located at the De la Cruz Collection which is a private collection owned and started by Rosa and Carlos De la Cruz. The De la Cruz couple had personal ties to Felix which made the exhibit even more impactful.

Felix was a Cuban artist who referred to himself as American and crafted his work around engagement of the community. His main intentions of his pieces were to be intellectually immersive and some physically immersive. He wanted his art to give something more to people, so he began crafting pieces with the sole purpose of it being given to anyone who sees it, for free. Many of his art installments were untitled, but there was a subtext which provided some insight on the meaning. A specific piece that gave to the public and is untitled is the stack of white candies on the floor which is crafted in his father’s memory as it detailed in the subtext. These white candies may not mean much to the outside eye, but the idea that it is art that one can interact with is significant.

Another piece of giving art made by Felix was these two stacks of paper with one sentence on each, “Somewhere better than this place” on one and “Nowhere better than this place” on the other. Felix wanted people to take a paper and choose their own meaning. He wanted people to think upon their life and make the decision if they were where they were meant to be or if they still had to find their better place. Obviously, some viewers may not think much and just choose one or both simply because it is there, but it was the idea that Felix made this piece to influence the mind and allowed this influence to be a take-home item.

Art can tell many stories and hold many meanings, but the most significant art is art that gives. Felix Gonzalez-Torres spent his life telling his stories through art that put the mind to work, but also established new meaning by giving his art. He was and forever will be an inspiration that lives on through his powerful pieces.


Coconut Grove as Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“The Creator’s Home”

Coconut Grove is far from what it used to be, yet the stories of its past remain intact in several places. Like all Southern Florida, the land that would eventually turn into the city we know belonged to the original inhabitants, the Tequestas. The Seminoles also shared this land as time went on, but the first to live were the Tequestas. These were the Miamians before Miami, and they created the beginning of the Miami legacy. There is much to learn about these original creators, but this story is of those less spoken of, the Bahamians.

Coconut Grove existed prior to Miami being incorporated as a city and had an influx of settlers from the Bahamas and other Northern states. While the settlers from the northern states did make a name for themselves such as the Munroe family, the Bahamian presence and impact is the focus. These were laborers, but they were so much more than that. The Bahamians were one of the few who knew how to thrive in the Southern Florida environment and work with what they were given. They knew how to plant crops, harvest food, and use limestone to aid in construction projects that would put roofs over their heads. Without them, Miami may not have existed in the way it does. Bahamians travelled for a better life opportunity and were one of the first immigrant groups to arrive in the Grove which makes it one of the oldest black communities in Dade County to date.

Of the many, the most notable Bahamians would be E.W.F Stirrup and Mariah Brown. The stories of these two individuals in unlike any other. E.W.F Stirrup started his life in Key West and used his charismatic spirit to get into the world of real estate. He became one of the icons for Bahamians and was one of the few rich Black men. He would buy several plots of land and would sell them to other Blacks because he believed that homeownership was key to a better life and being a better person. He also built himself a beautiful two-story house that would be wood-framed and is still standing to this day. Aside from selling houses, he owned several local stores which made the community thrive. E.W.F Stirrup is a man to be remembered for the impact he had on the creation of the Coconut Grove community. Mariah Brown was a pioneer in the Grove. She had travelled to work at the Peacock Inn and her family was one of the first to settle in Coconut Grove. Her significance is within her homeownership. She had purchased land for $50 and constructed her house. She is known as one of the first Black homeowners and she is a woman which expresses the importance of women in the creation of Miami. It is a one-and-a-half story white house built out of Dade County Slash Pine with a construction design intended to aid in harsh weather such as humidity, tropical storms, and wind pressure. This design was influenced by Bahamians as this came from their homeland and was known as Conch houses. Conch houses were made with large roof overhangs and high ceilings among other features to ensure airflow and sturdiness. Brown’s house is still standing today but does not seem to be receiving the care it deserves, so there is something to be said about that. These are landmarks and they should be treasured, not trashed.

In the city of Coconut Grove, there is a cemetery. This is unlike any other cemetery as it is solely a Bahamian cemetery. This is a place for Bahamians to recognize their loved ones and the creators of Coconut Grove that were not white. Where it is today was not its original location, but it outgrew the previous space and required a different location. For this move to occur respectfully and correctly, the leaders of the city such as E.W.F Stirrup and others purchased the property it is on today to keep their loved ones safe and secure. This is the resting place of many of the creators of Coconut Grove and it should be kept as such. A unique feature about this cemetery is that all the caskets are above ground. In my opinion, it added a personal touch and allowed for a deeper level of respect and recognition to be given. This cemetery is a constant reminder of who created Coconut Grove and who is keeping the creation alive. Coconut Grove is one of the oldest black communities in Dade County and it should be known that it is the home of the creators. It is home of the laborers. It is home of the constructors behind most of Miami. History has stories of these individuals, but we must continue to tell them, so that they may never be forgotten.


Key Biscayne As Text

Photograph by Liza Guanch// CC by 4.0

“Escape to Paradise”

What is the ideal outdoor location? Beach access? Trails to walk or bike through? Areas for fishing? Restaurants/Cafes on site? Or simply just somewhere to sit? Whatever your preferences may be, Bill Baggs State Park has it all. It is at the farthest end of Key Biscayne and is made up of 442 acres of natural beauty. It is home to one of the oldest standing structures in Miami Dade County, the Cape Florida Lighthouse, and protects a vast majority of South Florida’s natural landscape and wildlife.

Once you pass the entrance, you are immediately transported into a tranquil paradise. This park has so much to offer, both in activities and history. The Cape Florida Lighthouse, which is a must-see location, was built in 1825, but suffered damage during the Seminole Wars, so it was reconstructed in 1846. This lighthouse is not currently in active use, but there are tours offered for locals and tourists to see some breathtaking sights from atop the lighthouse and to experience what it was like inside a lighthouse. Many are familiar with the underground railroad, but there is another underground railroad that is not often spoken of. Between the years 1821 and 1861, there was a coastal route that would help lead slaves to freedom in the Bahamas and it was known as the Saltwater Underground Railroad. The Saltwater Underground Railroad route would occur in Cape Florida which is the land that Bill Baggs is on today, making this state park more interesting. The Cape Florida Lighthouse is listed on the National Register for Historical Places and Cape Florida is known as a National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Site to allow the continued remembrance of the lives they saved, and the slaves freed.

To be at the park is to be immersed in nature and to step on the park’s soil is to be taking the same steps as history. Marjory Stoneman Douglas once called Key Biscayne, “a romantic hideaway”, however I believe that the true hideaway is in Bill Baggs State Park. Bill Baggs State Park is simply a drive away for Miami locals, so if there’s ever a need to escape to paradise, it is found there.


Brittney Sanchez: Miracle Mile 2021

Photo of Brittney Sanchez. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Hello! My name is Brittney Sanchez. I am a junior at Florida International University, in the beautiful city of Miami. I have an Associate in Arts degree in Pre-Recreational Therapy and I am currently in the Honors College pursuing a bachelors degree in Physical Education: Sports and Fitness. I love to explore, travel, and learn new things. For this reason, I knew that John W. Bailly’s Miami in Miami class was the right fit for me. Being homeschooled gave me the opportunity to travel to many places, but this class has shown me that I do not have to travel far to learn about unique cultures, see fascinating landmarks, and immerse myself into adventurous experiences. For my Ineffable Miami project I chose to explore a beautiful area in downtown Coral Gables called Miracle Mile. Learn more about this sought-after destination below!

Photo of Miracle Mile sign. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0
Screenshot of Miracle Mile on Mapquest. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Miracle Mile is at the heart of Coral Gables, Florida, United States. It is a relatively small area that spans about 0.5 miles. Miracle Mile is bordered by two main streets to the west and east sides. Lejeune Road (SW 42nd Ave.) lies to the west of Miracle Mile, and Douglas Road (SW 37th Ave.) lies to the east of Miracle Mile. Unlike these streets, many street names surrounding Miracle Mile do not have numerical values, they are simply known by their Spaniard names. For example, Andalucia Avenue, which is south of Miracle Mile and Aragon Avenue which is north of Miracle Mile. The halfway point of Miracle Mile is another famous street known as, Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Although this four block strip only takes up a small portion of Coral Gables, it fits in perfectly with the upscale element that Coral Gables is known for. 

Photo of Miracle Mile. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0
Photo of Mr. and Mrs. Miracle Mile. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

According to the Coral Gables Museum’s website, “The story of Coral Gables’ signature street, Miracle Mile, is one of leadership, resilience, and adaptation.” It all began in the 1920s when George Merrick, the well-known real estate developer, established Coral Gables. After the Great Depression, many more individuals and groups helped establish the Mile. Two of these visionaries were George K. and this wife Rebyl Zain. George is known as the “Father of Miracle Mile” because he began purchasing land in 1937 and put his plan into action to create an outdoor mall in the heart of Coral Gables. This brand new idea of an outdoor shopping mall was quickly spreading throughout the nation, and many young developers and business owners took advantage of this opportunity. In 1944, Albert Friedman and his wife Rose Freidman, also known as “Mr. and Mrs. Miracle Mile,” opened their business on Coral Way along with J. Baldi, Sam Weissel, and Caroll Seghers. They all formed the Miracle Mile Merchants Association and they turned the wide open streets of Coral Gables and help renamed it to the now-famous, Miracle Mile in 1955. 

I N T E R V I E W:

Photo of Nick Portu. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Although there is no demographic data for Miracle Mile, I interviewed Nick Portu, a nearby resident and frequent visitor of Miracle Mile. 

Brittney: What is your favorite aspect of Miracle Mile?

Nick: “My favorite aspect is the ability to walk around and see a diverse culture.”

Brittney: How would you describe Miracle Mile?

Nick: “I love Miracle Mile because it has rich historical roots and there are many things to do. There are many elite restaurants and stores due to high rent. Miracle mile draws people in from all over, from the city of Coral Gables, city of Miami, and even tourists from all over the world.”

Brittney: Where is your favorite place to eat?

Nick: “Hillstone. They have the best burgers, steaks, and mashed potatoes in Miami.”

Brittney: If someone you knew were coming to Miracle Mile, where would u take them?

Nick: “I would take them to eat at Hillstone, then we would go get ice cream at Häagen-Dazs, then we would shop at the Men’s Wear House, and we would end at Doc B’s for dinner.”

Brittney: What is your favorite thing to do at Miracle Mile?

Nick: “Before the pandemic, my favorite place to go was the Millers Ale House. I would get beers and watch sports with my friends, but unfortunately this restaurant has been shut down due to the current pandemic.”

Brittney: What is your least favorite aspect of Miracle Mile?

Nick: “Definitely the parking.”

Brittney: How do you wish to see Miracle Mile in 5 years?

Nick: “In 5 years, I hope Miracle Mile will continue being as successful as it is now and add more restaurants that can add more reputation to the Mile.”

Photo of Coral Gables City Hall. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Coral Gables City Hall (405 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

Although there are no major landmarks in Miracle Mile due to its small surface area, there are many historical landmarks surrounding it. Among these historic sites is the Coral Gables City Hall located on 405 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables. This huge 3 story building is at the beginning of Miracle Mile. It is truly majestic, and some may even say it looks like a castle. Its architectural style is a mix of Mediterranean with vegetation from Miami. Standing in front of the building is a tall bronze statue of George Merrick. He can be seen standing in  contraposto, holding a scroll with his left hand, and carrying a jacket over his right shoulder.  

Photo of Coral Gables Museum. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Coral Gables Museum (285 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

Slightly North of Miracle Mile lies the small Coral Gables museum. It was built in 1939 but it re-opened in 2010. Many people do not know that this museum is actually located in the old Police and Fire Station of Coral Gables. There used to be a courtroom, jail cells, offices, living quarters for the firefighters, etc. Today, it’s unique LEED certification plays a big part in the green city initiative. Visitors are invited to explore this museum and much of its original building design which include Cuban tile floors and walls, concrete flooring, and coral rock walls.

Photo of First Church of Christ, Scientist. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

First Church of Christ, Scientist (410 Andalusia Ave, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

Slightly West of Miracle Mile lies the First Church of Christ, Scientist on Andalucia Avenue. It is a Christian church that hosts services on Sunday and Wednesday. It also has a reading room that is open Monday- Saturday, 11am – 3 pm and Sundays from 11 am- 12 noon.

Much like many other areas in Miami, Miracle Mile does not have many green spaces. The layout of the street leaves no room for green spaces, and plenty of room for buildings and paved roads. However, palm trees line every road, and there are many large trees that provide shade and a nice breeze for people walking through the outdoor mall.

Merrick Park (405 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, FL 33134) and Coral Gables City Hall (405 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

The only two notable spaces of grass are in front of the Coral Gables City Hall and a small park called Merrick park between Andalucia Avenue and Biltmore way. Although this area simply serves as a meager green space throughout most of the year, during the holidays, it is transformed into a small Christmas themed park with a looming Santa structure facing Miracle Mile.  

There are many modes of transportation that can be used in Miracle Mile. These include using a car, motorcycle, trolley, shuttle, bike, scooter, and obviously, by walking. 

Car / Motorcycle- There are always many cars and motorcycles trying to park or drive down Miracle Mile. Miami is known for its chaotic traffic, and Miracle Mile definitely lives up to this fact. If you plan on going to Miracle Mile, make sure you know how to parallel park and you have plenty of time to find parking.  Although there are parking spaces on the Mile, they are usually full, and visitors may have to find parking in the nearby streets. All of these parking spaces are metered and end up being very costly, if you plan on staying for the entire day.

Coral Gables Trolley – According to Miami Dade’s Metrobus Route website, “The City of Coral Gables provides this service. Douglas Road Metrorail Station, Merrick Park, Miracle Mile, Ponce de Leon Blvd, Flagler Street.”

Freebee shuttle – This free shuttle runs everyday from 10 am to 10 pm. If you’d like a ride, you simple download the Freebee app that is accessible through the App store or Google play store and order a ride through there. This green on-demand shuttle service runs through all of Coral Gables and it is a great way to ride around Miracle Mile.

Bike/Walking – Miracle Mile has enlarged sidewalks that allow many people to stroll down the street with ease. Although there is plenty of space to walk, bike, or hop on a scooter, it wasn’t always like this. About a few years ago, they remodeled the street, and expanded the sidewalks and reduced the amount of parking space. With the new parallel parking, Miracle Mile has a much wider and ample space for avid shoppers to peruse many boutiques.

Scooters – Bird electric scooters are available to rent all over Miracle Mile. To rent the scooter, you need to find one, download the free app, and register as a new rider. According to the Coral Gables website, “Cost is $1 to unlock a new ride, plus $0.15 per minute. Bird requires all riders be over the age of 18, and encourages everyone to wear a helmet while riding. They will send any rider who requests one a free helmet.” They are fairly easy to ride, but you must watch out for people walking, as it can be easy to crash if there are many people on the sidewalk.

Photo of K.A.O. restaurant. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

K.A.O. Sushi and Grill (127 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

K.A.O. is an Asian inspired restaurant in Miracle Mile. It is known for its meats, fish, and most importantly, sushi. I have eaten at this restaurant many times, and my favorite dish is the Teriyaki Pork Medallions. These medallions will melt in your mouth. Their menu has many different options and to start off, everyone is served a miso soup shot when they’re seated at their table. K.A.O. offers many different discounts, such as ladies night specials, happy hour specials, and more. They’re relaxing and elegant ambience fits in perfectly with the Miracle Mile atmosphere. Although it might seem like a relatively small area at first, this restaurant expands further back to allow room for a large maximum capacity. This space allows them to host many events such as monthly salsa and bachata dance nights.

Google’s Review: 4.6 Stars

Brittney’s Review: 5 Stars

Salumeria 104 (117 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

If you are looking for authentic Italian food, Salumeria 104 is the right place to go. This restaurant on Miracle Mile is always packed with hungry customers throughout the entire day. According to Salumeria 104’s website, “Salumeria 104 is a rustic, trattoria-style restaurant serving signature salumi dishes, and traditional home-made Italian classics.” They have great service and even better food. Their plates are expensive, but they are also very abundant. My favorite dish is the Tagliolini. This dish consists of shrimp and pasta with a hint of lemon zest and pistachios. It is absolutely mouth-watering!

Google’s review: 4.6 Stars

Brittney’s review: 4.8 Stars

Photo of P.Pole Pizza. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

P. Pole Pizza (279 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

P.Pole pizza offers an endless variety of options. This personalized pizza place is similar to Subways. You choose your favorite dough, then you choose your sauce as the base, and then the toppings. They prepare and bake the pizza right in front of your eyes! Their unique approach to pizza makes it a great addition to Miracle Mile. It is affordable, unique, and delicious.

Google’s Review: 4.7 Stars

Brittney’s Review: 4.8 Stars

Photo of Miracle Theatre. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Miracle Theatre (280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

The Actors’ playhouse at the Miracle Theatre was established in 1988 by Dr. Lawrence E. Stein. According to the Actors’ Playhouse website, it”…is the largest self-producer of critically acclaimed dramatic and musical theatre for adults and children in South Florida. The private nonprofit organization presents a full season of Mainstage and Children’s programs and extensive educational outreach and community service.” They are known for showing contemporary and classic live theater productions and offering educational and outreach programs for both adults and children of all ages. They have also won many awards and other distinguished honors throughout the years.

Photo of Gables Coin and Stamp Shop. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Gables Coin and Stamp Shop (82 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

This small department store in the middle of Miracle Mile surely stands out among the many high-end boutiques. It was founded in 1967 by Mr. John Albright and still serves many costumers today. They sell coins and bills from the U.S. as well as many distinct coins from other countries, such as Asia, Australia, Africa, Middle East, South America, North and Central America, and Europe. They also buy or sell jewelry, watches, and diamonds.

Photo of Spy World. Photo by Brittney Sanchez / CC BY 4.0

Spy World (96 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, FL 33134)

The Spy World shop is another store that stands out in Miracle Mile. This store is packed with technology for safety and security. They have 27 years of experience and their mission is to help protect customers’ homes, family, and businesses with their safety technology. They offer a wide variety of products such as hidden cameras, bug detectors, recorders, GPS trackers, and more. They even have unique items that people usually only see in Crime TV shows or movies.

Miracle Mile is well known for attracting visitors from all over the world to its prestigious boutiques, high-end restaurants, and quality shops. There is something to do for all ages. Its relaxed and leisure environment is perfect for a day full of shopping and dining with your family, while its bustling nightlife ambiance is perfect for a night out with friends or a romantic date with your significant other. There are also many events that take place on the Mile such as weekly farmer markets, the Eggstreme Egg Hunt in March, the Pumpkin Patch in October, and the Holiday Tree Lighting in December.

I have been to Miracle Mile many times, whether it be to study at Barnes and Nobles with friends, or simply passing by the busy streets of Miracle Mile on my way back from work, but creating this Ineffable Miami project has given me the opportunity to truly appreciate this part of Coral Gables. Much like many things in life, I easily take for granted the beauty of Miracle Mile. It amazes me that many people pay hundreds of dollars to simply travel to this prestigious outdoor shopping mall, and I have the opportunity to drive through Miracle Mile almost every single day. I hope that Miracle Mile continues to thrive so that I am able to show my future kids the history that lies in such a beautiful place like Miracle Mile.

C I T A T I O N S:

Actors’ Playhouse at the Miracle Theatre. About Us. Retrieved from https://www.actorsplayhouse.org/about-us/

Coral Gables. Bird Launches Scooter Option in Coral Gables. Retrieved from https://www.coralgables.com/news/bird-launches-scooter-option-in-coral-gables

Coral Gables. (2015, September 29). Retrieved from http://christianscienceflorida.org/about/coral-gables/

Gables Coin and Stamp Shop Since 1967. Retrieved from http://www.gablescoin.com

Metrobus Route. Coral Gables Trolley. Retrieved from https://www.miamidade.gov/transit/mobile/metrobus_routes.asp?routeID=9011&routeName=Coral+Gables+Trolley

Miracle mile: The evolution of a street. (2018, December 19). Retrieved from https://coralgablesmuseum.org/portfolio-item/miracle-mile-evolution-street

Salumeria 104. Retrieved from https://www.salumeria104.com

Spy World. Spy World Miami. Retrieved from https://www.spyworldmiami.com

W., A., P., S., E., F., U., A., & V., J. (n.d.). Downtown coral GABLES & Miracle mile 220 Miracle Mile Miami, FL shopping centers & malls. Retrieved from https://www.mapquest.com/us/florida/downtown-coral-gables-miracle-mile-277649875

Hugo Marin: Miami as Text

Hi everyone, My name is Hugo Marin and I am a Finance major attending FIU Honors College. I am a Miami local and have lived here for all 21 years of my life. I grew up in an Ecuadorian household because both sets of grandparent came from Ecuador, during my parents high school years, in search of a better life. I feel very blessed to grow up both as an American and as an Ecuadorian. These dual cultures were extremely easy to integrate into Miami because of the strong hispanic presence in our city. I love to wakeboard, surf, travel, and explore. Having seen most of Miami all my life, I am excited to take a different approach and see my city in a new light.

DOwntown miami as text

“More Than Meets the Eye” By Hugo Marin of FIU at Downtown

Downtown Miami, the heart of my city, my home. Coming into this guided tour I was not expecting much. I thought that I could learn little Easter eggs here and there about downtown. However, I was blown away by how much I did not know about areas that I have passed by a million times before. The city has such a rich and diverse history that was never really taught to me in schools. The only way to learn this information is to be an active learner and go out into the world.

Going out into the world is something that has been taking away from us because of the pandemic. So, it was great that I got the opportunity to get to do so with FIU. I thought it was funny that my first in person class in almost a year wasn’t even in an actual classroom. We first met up at the government center at the “Dropped Bowl with Scattered Slices and Peels”. I had not been inside the government center since the 2013 Miami Heat Parade. Although, I have passed by that street plenty of times, I’m embarrassed to say that I always thought that was just an abstract art piece. This was the start of a trend of things that I’ve seen but never taken the time to appreciate and learn what they actually are. From there we made our way towards the underpart of the highway by the new skate park. From prior knowledge, I already knew how the highway devastated the African American community in OverTown. When the highway was being built the community was forced to split causing many business and people to leave the area. What I didn’t know was, what that devastation meant in reality. To actually be there to experience the constant noise of cars, the smell of CO2, and the homeless crisis that’s happening there opens your eyes to the extent of damage that the highway has caused.

One of the things that stood out to me on this tour, was the history of the Tequesta or the lack there of. It was very sad to find out how little we know about Miami’s true native population. We learned about how most were killed by disease and then forced out of the strip of livable land. What made this worse was how their history was erased time and time again. For example, Flagler instructed his railroad workers to build over and discard a Tequesta burial site. Then later on, a building was constructed over a center of their civilization. This center, known now as the Miami circle, is located next to where the fresh water from the Miami river meets the salt water of the ocean. Most recently the Whole Foods in downtown was built over a Tequesta site and the archeologist were given barely any time to conduct research.

The most memorable part of the tour was when we gathered at a Miami’s Lummus Park and discussed the history of plantations in the south. The buildup of that discussion, to the final reveal of there being a fully intact slave quarters right behind us, was unlike anything I ever experienced in school. It was amazing to see a building with such a rich history just sitting in a random park in downtown. This is when I realized the importance of this type of learning that cannot be replicated in a classroom. Even if I read the info sign about Fort Dallas on my own, it would have not sparked this type of invested curiosity. I have never been so excited to pass on the things I learned in class to my family and friends.

EVERGLADES AS TEXT

“How it Was Supposed to be” By Hugo Marin of FIU at Everglades

Miami is renowned for its beaches and sunny blue skies. You would think that this city is very in touch with nature, but unfortunately that is not the case. Many people from Miami live the “salt life” because of how close we are to the ocean but Miami’s true nature has been lost. Other than the occasional park, Miami is mostly streets, houses, and buildings. If you want to see how Miami was supposed to be without human intervention you have to go out west to one of the largest national parks known as the Everglades.

I have visited the Everglades numerous times before with family and friends. Usually when I have come we go to the main visitor centers like the Anhinga trail. Sometimes we come at night to get the best view of meteor showers. I have never visited the park like this though. To be able to go of trail and actually go into the everglades was an experience I will never forget. The activity we did was know as Slough Slogging. We parked our cars of the main road and proceed to enter what is called the Double Dome. A dome is made up a bunch of cypress trees that concentrate at the to give it a dome shape. As the cypress trees age there roots dig up more of the soil creating very deep spots at the center of the dome. These spots can have water all the way up to your shoulders. It was exciting and scary to be shoulder deep in the same water as alligators. Although, our ranger assured us that we had nothing to worry about as they were more scared of our big group and were probably long gone before we got anywhere near them. I still had the chance to see other wildlife like birds, lizards, spiders and a Florida Gar.

The whole Slough Slogging experience was easily my favorite part of the whole day but what I enjoyed the most about the slough slogging were three instances where I felt like I was truly connected to the land. The first instance was when the ranger told us to have a moment of silence and just listen. Since we were in a big group the silence was a huge change to the noise we were making before. Once we all quieted down I was able to hear the wind swaying the trees, the birds calling one another, and the splashes of water. Not only was I able to hear more clearly but I was also able to feel more clearly as well. I could feel the slow rush of the water around me and the sunlight making its way through the trees. The next instance where I felt connected to the land was when we made it all the way to the other side of the the Double Dome. Being on the other side of it you could truly appreciate its scale and beauty. It felt like an accomplishment to be out in the wilderness having successfully gone through the Double Dome. The final instance was on our way back where we were encourage to go of on our own. This instance felt like the moment of silence tenfold. The water was crystal clear when you went of on your own. This was when I was able to see more wildlife as well and could appreciate everything more. Although when I noticed all the wildlife I was seeing I got worried about seeing an alligator and quickly made my was back closer to everyone else.

There was a point when we talked about how other places have such rich history and culture because of the land that they live on. Miami isn’t as old as other places, but since we have this shared land and experience culture can be cultivated from this. Like how a poet that comes to do Slough Slogging by herself, creates poems from her experiences here. This experience is Miami.

DEERING ESTATE AS TEXT

“The Most Diverse 450 Acres In Miami” By Hugo Marin Of FIU at Deering Estate

This trip to the Deering Estate has been the one that has surprised me the most so far. This is because this trip was was not what I expected to see at all. I was expecting to go to an Estate. In my mind an estate is when a rich person has a mansion with a lot of land that’s usually well taken care. In the entrance of the estate this preconceived notion of mine was true. It was a beautiful mansion with a Mediterranean type of architecture. The landscape was very well groomed and taken care of. Behind the mansion was a picture perfect set up of palm trees on either side of a man made canal, overlooking the ocean. This estate was so beautiful its a no brainer why there was a wedding being set up there on our visit. The mansion itself was also very well kept and was like a blast into the past with its interior design style and preserved kitchen, bedrooms, and prohibition era alcohol vault. Although this was all super cool and the history of this place was fascinating, none of this was completely un expected. What I didn’t expect was our 7 mile hike into various ecosystems that are also on the estate.

At the start of our trip here, we left the well groomed land up to a gate that normal visitors usually aren’t allowed to go past. Here we were instructed to put on our bug spray as we waited for one of the workers to come open the gate for us. This gate gave me Narnia or Bridge to Terabithia vibes as it felt like we were fully transported into a new world. On our hike we came across six different type of ecosystems that were being conserved on the property. The six ecosystems we came across were the Hardwood Hammock, Salt Marsh, Pine Rocklands, Mangrove Forest, Sea Grass Beds, and Slough Creek Habitat. I was amazed how every mile or so we were in a completely new and unique ecosystem that was very different from the previous one. What amazed me the most was the rock ridges, caves, and cliffs that we saw because I didn’t expect that to be found in South Florida. Its crazy to think that all of these ecosystems can be found just a couple miles of US one .

Vizcaya as text

“Money, Party, Art” By Hugo Marin of FIU at Vizcaya

Even though I have lived in Miami all my life I have never been to Vizcaya. My parents have always told me to go there which is why I was very excited for this trip. Upon arriving there I was greeted by lost of Greek statues in the entrance and a roman archway. These are the type of things you would find in a museum in Europe but they were just chilling here in Vizcaya. At the entrance of the mansion we are greeted by the Greek God of wine and pleasure. This theme of pleasure and luxury is one that is constantly thrown at your face while going around the property. This property reminded me of the Great Gatsby and the extravagance of that mansion and party life in the early 1920s. Although I think Vizcaya might have the Great Gatsby beat.

The house itself was uniquely designed in that the rooms all flowed into each other and the “outside” seamlessly connected to the “inside”. Each room was just filled with so much art it all looked like it was supposed to be in a museum. My favorite room was the courtyard in the center of the house that connected all the rooms together. Unfortunately, when we went there was a lot of construction happening outside so we couldn’t really appreciate the fake boat that was built in the water that’s purposes was to break the waves from hitting the yachts that would park there. The Vizcaya Gardens were beautiful it had mazes, fountains, statues, and a canal were guest would come on their boats. This whole place looks like someone wanted to create the greatest party house ever. I can only imagined what it would be like to have gone to one of the parties hosted here.

MARGUILES AS TEXT

“One of Wynwood’s First” By Hugo Marin at The Margulies

It was really cool that the final trip we took was to an art collection. Last time i went to an art museum was at PAM over three years ago. I’m not really a huge art person but it was very cool to have this experience. What I found most fascinating was Martin Z Margulies the owner of this private collection. The story of him goes that he wasn’t very much into art, he mostly enjoyed sports and only bought an art piece for his girlfriend. Years later his girlfriend is a sports reporter and he is ne of the largest private art collections. The reason that he does this is not to horde art but rather to share it with the public and to meet new and interesting people. I was very jealous when I found out he was there early in the day for the other classes I would have very much liked the opportunity to get to meet him. He was one of the first to open an art collection in Wynwood before Wynwood became what it is today. I’m glad that has given back to the community with the center for women and children because one of the main things against Wynwood is that the area has become gentrified and is hurting the locals that used to live there.

This type of collection had one of my favorite types of art which is contemporary art. I like contemporary art because its not conventional art and really makes you think. At the same time though contemporary art can mean nothing and just be fun to look at. The four pieces that stood out to me were the T.Vs with the animals playing, the Last Supper, the sacks, and the elevator on the wall. The T.Vs with the animals playing was super fun to look at because of how it humanize the animals and you can see all different types of animals just having fun. The last supper one was interesting to me because it shocked me, being a catholic I found it slightly offensive and the shock value that it provided me was something that I found interesting. The sacks were fun because I have never experience an art piece that’s main focus was the use of scent. Finally the elevator one was one of my favorites because of how random it was and I could only imagine how awkward it must have been to film. I will definitely return to this collection with friends and family because of how affordable this collection is to see, everyone in Miami should go check it out.

Angelo Gomez : Hialeah 2021

STUDENT BIO

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)


Hello everyone, my name is Angelo Gomez. I’m nineteen years old and born here in Miami of Colombian descent. I’m currently a junior at Florida International University majoring in Political Science and Journalism. I am interning as a reporter for the South Florida Media Network at FIU. I enjoy learning new things and concepts. I speak Spanish and English, with a little mix of Italian and Portuguese here and there. I love to travel even though I don’t do it often enough. I’m a huge Marvel and Star Wars geek, a history nerd, and a soccer enthusiast.

GEOGRAPHY

Nestled in the geographical center of Miami-Dade County, there is no shortage of neighboring towns surrounding the city of Hialeah. They include Miami Lakes to the north, Hialeah Gardens to the West, Medley and Miami Springs to the south, and Opa-Locka, West Little River, Gladeview, and Brownsville to the east.

The city’s southern borders are mainly delineated by Okeechobee Road and by Amelia Earhart Park and FL State Road 916 (also known as NW 138th St) to the north. Hialeah’s urban geography is box and grid-like, while the neighboring towns of Miami Lakes and Miami Springs have differing street layouts more typical of suburbs.

Hialeah’s “main street” is considered 49th street, where the Westland Mall and Palm Springs Mile shopping plaza is located. Miami Dade College’s Hialeah Campus is also located on 49th street. Hialeah’s iconic JFK Library and Milander Park and Stadium are located across Red Road.

Hialeah is notorious for its lack of green space. In a study released by WalletHub, was ranked with the lowest percentage of green space in the entire country. Another study by WalletHub ranked Hialeah as the sixth-worst city in Recreation and parks.

A quick glance at the neighboring Miami Springs or Miami Lakes depicts more lakes and canals, and green spaces such as parks, golf courses, or pastures.

HISTORY

Early map of Hialeah (Photo in public domain)

Hialeah was developed by Glenn Curtis and James H. Bright and incorporated in 1921. The name “Hialeah” is a native indigenous term that means “high prairie.” During the city’s early years, the Hialeah Park and Casino was the city’s central attraction that brought visitors from all across the United States. During the 1920s until the beginning of the Great Depression, Hialeah blossomed into a tourist destination with a strong economy.

Intersection between Palm Avenue and County Road (Photo in public domain)

Traditionally, Hialeah has been a blue-collar city, home to the working class. Most of the workers of the Hialeah Park and Casino settled in the new city due to its cheap property value and short distance. The first homes developed in Hialeah were built off of County Road (now known as Okeechobee Road) and Hialeah Drive (First Street) with Palm Avenue. The city’s first homes, post offices, and shops were located around this area.

Following the 1926 Miami hurricane and the Great Depression, Hialeah experienced a post-war boom during the mid-century onwards. Led by iconic city mayor Henry Milander, who now has a park and stadium in the city named after him, he guided the city through an economic boom for more than three decades. According to the Miami Herald, the mayor offered tax incentives for businesses and industries to settle in Hialeah which payed off for the city. Likewise, the city experienced a population boom since its incorporation, growing at one of the fastest rates and being the sixth-largest city in the state of Florida.

Since the 1960s, there has been a great influx of Cuban exiles and Hispanic residents into the city of Hialeah. Many families fleeing from their former countries landed in Hialeah because of its inexpensive prices and joined the working community.

DEMOGRAPHICS

Hialeah is notorious for its Hispanic identity, and most notably for its Cuban population. These perceptions are largely true since the city’s population is 94% Hispanic and 73.37% Cuban. Hialeah is considered to be the largest population of Cuban residents in the entire United States. Policies such as the Cuban Adjustment Act and the “wet foot, dry foot” policy have facilitated Cuban exiles and refugees to settle in Miami and get their legal status. Thus, much have flocked to Hialeah to be surrounded by their culture. In a city originally founded by white settlers and pioneers, Hialeah has undergone a profound transformation.

Other demographic statistics show that 92.14% of the population speak Spanish primarily at home, and nearly 7% of the population speak English at home. Of the nearly 237,000 population, 74.3% of residents were born outside of the country and only 65.8% of residents are U.S. citizens, significantly lower than the national average. Hialeah is dominated by a Hispanic, foreign-born population. The city is considered the #2 city where Spanish is most spoken in the entire United States, behind Hialeah Gardens.

INTERVIEW

Balladares posing in front of a Burlington logo in Hialeah. (Photo by Leslia Balladares CC by 4.0)

What is your name and how long have you been living in Hialeah?

Hi, my name is Leslia Balladares and I have been living in Hialeah for about eight years.

What do you love about your city?

I love everything about my city, except traffic which is the worst.

How do you get around?

I don’t have a car so I get around everywhere through Uber for now.

What is your favorite restaurant?

My favorite restaurant is absolutely Los Ranchos Steakhouse near Westland Mall.

LANDMARKS

Hialeah Park and Casino

Built originally in 1922 by Glenn Curtis and James L. Bright, the Hialeah Park and race track served as a track for grayhound races and betting. Soon, it opened to horse racing and betting. Following the Miami hurricane of 1926, it was rebuilt and redeveloped into the new “Hialeah Park and Casino.” This is the most iconic landmark in Hialeah, and one of the most historic places in Miami, being one of the earliest recreational sites. The city’s website names “the Kennedy family, Harry Truman, General Omar Bradley, Winston Churchill, and J.P. Morgan” as some of the more popular figures that visited the place. In fact, Winston Churchill is quoted saying the place was “Extraordinary!” The site remained very popular throughout the later decades of the twentieth century and was reopened in 2013 with a casino and reintroducing quarter horse racing.

Hialeah Park and Racetrack (Photo in public Domain)

JFK Library

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

The John F. Kennedy Library on 49th street is the main campus of the Hialeah public library system. With its colorful murals surrounding the building, it is an attractive site to visit in Hialeah. There are often new murals and artwork outside the building, including a portrait of President John F. Kennedy and a trojan solider. The library offers a unique and extensive collection of Hialeah history. The site is a voting location during local and national elections.

Leah Arts District

Photo by Terrence Faircloth (CC by 2.0)

The Leah Arts District is a sector in Hialeah dedicated to public art and offering local artists “affordable living / work spaces while promoting art and culture,” according to the city’s website. Opened in 2015, stage festivals and public displays of art are organized to promote the up-and-coming art scene and artists that reside within the eccentric neighborhood. It is Hialeah’s unique take on public art similar to Wynwood and South Beach, but with its own local taste.

GREEN

Despite being listed as one of the worst cities for Parks and recreation, Hialeah offers a variety of small parks and green areas to visit.

Amelia Earhart Park

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

Amelia Earhart park is a 515-acre park in Hialeah which offers a wide variety of activities, such as biking, walking trails, soccer fields, extreme water sports, fishing piers, and picnic shelters. Amelia Earhart is one of the larger parks in Miami-Dade County available to Hialeah residents. The park is named after famous pilot Amelia Earhart since the former Miami Municipal Airport (now Opa-Locka Airport) nearby was her final appearance and goodbye before disappearing over the Atlantic.

Milander Park

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

Milander Park is a 19.2 acre park, aquatic center, arts and entrainment venue, and stadium located on 49th street in Hialeah. The site has multiple basketball and baseball fields for recreational use. Additionally, there is a playground for children to use. The venue is used to display art exhibits and to host special events. The Ted Hendricks stadium is used for a variety of sporting events for different high schools and host the semi-professional soccer club Miami United.

Garden of the Arts

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

Garden of the arts is small, open-air art display inside of a green park in Hialeah. This passive park consists of murals, sculptures, monuments, and a small amphitheater where guests can roam and walk around while admiring the artwork on display. According to their website, the City of Hialeah built this green park through he county’s Building Better Communities Bond Program.

TRANSPORTATION

Like the rest of Miami-Dade County, Hialeah is dominated by cars as the primary mode of transportation. According to DataUSA, the majority of households in Hialeah have two or three cars. The major highway that passes through the center of Hialeah is the Florida 826 (Palmetto Expressway). The Florida Turnpike is nearby to the west and the Gratigny Parkway is accessible at the northern boundary, connecting Hialeah commuters to both I-75 to the west and I-95 to the east. Likewise, the Okeechobee Road delineates the city’s southern border and is accessible by taking the I-595/FL State Road 112 westward until it ends at Okeechobee Road near the Miami International Airport.

The city also offers public transportation, the Hialeah transit system. The buses run on two separate routes – the Marlin and Flamingo routes. The city’s website lists a full fare as $2.25 or a full monthly pass for $60.

Likewise, there are several public transportation options offered by Miami-Dade County that are accessible in Hialeah. The Metrobus offers many routes that connect or pass by Hialeah that are operational daily. The MetroRail has multiple stations in the city, such as the Tri-Rail/MetroRail, Okeechobee, and Hialeah stations. In the Miami Station, Amtrak trains and Tri-Rail trains are accessible to residents. Finally, the Tri-Rail has two stations within the city: in the Tri-Rail/MetroRail station and the Hialeah Market station leading to the airport.

FOOD

Molina’s Ranch Restaurant

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

This restaurant opened in 1982, and has become a popular site among locals. This restaurant serves traditional Cuban food and cuisine familiar to much of the restaurant’s customers. Their website credits celebrities such as Arnold Schwarzenegger, Celia Cruz, Frankie Ruiz, and others that have visited their restaurant.

Morro Castle

Photo by Angelo Gomez (CC by 4.0)

Morro Castle is a small, family-owned restaurant that have been in business since 1966. According to the Miami New Times, “… family-owned Cuban cafeteria Morro Castle has been Hialeah’s source for good, affordable bistec de palomilla, tostones, and moro.”

Polo Norte

Photo by Angelo (CC by 4.0)

This restaurant has become a popular restaurant chain in South Florida. Known for their delicious Cuban pizzas, the original Polo Norte opened in Hialeah, before branching out to other locations across Miami. The restaurant offers a diverse menu of Cuban pizzas with different topics, Cuban sandwiches and paninis, and other entrée menus with Cuban flare.

BUSINESSES

Ibiley Uniforms

Ibiley Unforms is one of the major uniform retail stores for schools across Miami-Dade public schools. Visiting the Hialeah store in early August, one can find long lines of parents purchasing their children’s uniforms for the upcoming school year. Ibiley Uniforms was founded by a immigrant Cuban family living in Miami after escaping the Castro regime.

Valsan

One of Hialeah’s most popular stores, the Valsan department store on W 4th Avenue has become a local shopping hub. Their commercials have become a mainstay on Spanish television through their funny commercials and its popular jingle.

Farmacia Cali

Farmacia Cali is a small Colombian pharmacy off of West 60th Street that offers over-the-counter medicines and ailments for customers.

SUMMARY

To conclude, Hialeah is a fascinating city in the heart of Miami-Dade County. Often ridiculed and joked about, Hialeah is a working class community made up of Cuban exiles, immigrants, and hard-workers. Many Hialeans are proud of living in their city and wear it as a badge of honor. Despite the city’s faults, there is a special culture within the city as one of the country’s few Hispanic immigrant enclaves.

CITATIONS

Census.gov. Hialeah. n.d. Web Site. 15 April 2021.

DataUSA. Hialeah, FL. n.d. Web Site. 20 April 2021.

Herring, Chloe. Miami Herald – Turns out Hialeah is actually the least diverse US city. 21 February 2017. Newspaper. 19 April 2021.

Lipscomb, Jessica. Why Is Hialeah Always Ranked the Worst City for Everything? 16 January 2019. Newspaper. 20 April 2021.

Miami Herald Archives. What did Hialeah used to look like? Here is a peek through the time machine. 4 November 2019. Web Site. 19 April 2021.

Miami New Times. Molina’s Ranch Restaurant. n.d. 23 April 2021.

Molina’s Ranch Restaurant. n.d. 23 April 2021.

Polo Norte. About Us. n.d. Web Site. 23 April 2021.

The City of Hialeah. Milander Park Recreation Center. n.d. Web site. 23 April 2021.

WalletHub. Best & Worst Cities for Recreation. 2 July 2019. Web Site. 20 April 2021.

—. Cities with the Best & Worst Public Transportation. 10 September 2019. Web Site. 19 April 2021.

Wikipedia. Hialeah, FL. n.d. 20 April 2021.

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