Victoria Jackson: Miami as Text

Photo taken of Victoria Jackson in 2020. Photo by Nigel Courtney/ CC BY 4.0

Hello Everyone! My name is Victoria Jackson and I was born and raised in Miami Florida. I am junior in the Honors College at Florida International University studying English-Education. Outside of school I love travelling, reading and dancing. I am looking forward to exploring the place I have called home, seeing and experiencing the different wonders Miami has to offer and creating memories with the rest of my classmates.

Deering as Text

Photo by Victoria Jackson/ CC BY 4.0

“A Trickle in Time”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT THE DEERING ESTATE, 8 SEPTEMBER 2020

From the moment you enter the grounds of the Deering Estate, you feel as if you are being far removed from society and entering a world from another time. We stepped into and gazed at a true Miami that was untouched and uncultivated. We were greeted by a variety of plants, an untamed wildlife environment and a rich history.

While hiking we explored the limited history of the Tequesta people, a tribe of people who existed and inhabited the land before us. Having a glimpse of their life and holding the tools they used was such a memorable experience. During our journey we came across one of their last surviving burial mounds. They were buried face down with their heads together and on top of their remains rested a large tree. We were told that it is said that their life force flows from them into the tree, providing it with life and the ability to grow to new heights.

I truly felt it. I felt not only the energy going into the tree but intertwining and exuding into the vast surrounding nature. Seeping into the soil and providing a strong foundation for the flora and fauna to thrive off of. I felt completely as one and surrounded by the spirits of our geographical ancestors. Surrounded by the spirits of the people who once occupied the land that we know today. Surrounded by the spirits whose names we do not know, whose appearance we are unaware of and whose tribe was decimated, still helping to enrich the land, and helping life to continue on. Time has continued on and their people are no more but as my mud-covered shoes hit the same trail that they walked all those many years ago I felt connected.

South Beach as Text

Photo by Victoria Jackson/ CC BY 4.0

“A Reflection of a Shinning City”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT SOUTH BEACH, 20 SEPTEMBER 2020

Millions of tourists flock to the beautiful icon and staple of Miami that lies on the south part of Miami Beach. They come to immerse themselves in a community with different people and styles. They come to take part in the action on Ocean Drive and experience all the sights, sounds and smells that the area comes with. To experience this wonderful blend of art, history, and cultural heritage. An experience that a lot of us who live here in Miami take for granted.

While walking with the class I felt like I had a special lens on that was allowing me to see the streets I have traveled a couple of times before in a new and clearer way. Many people wish they could revisit something for the first time again and feel the same amazement, admiration, curiosity, and excitement as they did initially. As we went on with our journey, I felt like I was getting a chance to experience this wish. That I was seeing and experiencing South Beach for the first time through a whole different perspective.

We learned about the amazing inspirations and ideas that formed the wonderful architecture that adds to the unique culture of Miami. Viewing the great Miami Modern, MiMo, architecture and its geometric style, nautical theme, curved and open court characteristics. Looking at the beautiful and scenic concentration of Art Deco buildings graced with symmetrical and repetitive patterns of natural elements, neon colors, pastel highlights and shaped by dreams and ideas of the future.

As we continued to make our way, I could not help but think back to what we learned about the great and beneficial yet awful, segregated, and dehumanized foundation of the neighborhood that we have come to know. I was shocked that not only had it happened but also that it was information that was not well known. When I recounted the details to some family and friends they were just as taken aback as I was. It upset me that these things are not being discussed leading to not only more ignorance but a lack of honor to the individuals who built and did so much for the area without getting recognition. While we can see how times have evolved and how South Beach has become a place for acceptance for all types of people, it is instances like these that show how many steps Miami has taken in terms of justice, honor and accountability.

The idea of viewing this community from a new perspective was amplified when we saw the impact that the Coronavirus is having on the area. While it was unique opportunity to walk through the streets without much car or foot traffic and have a glimpse into a more peaceful atmosphere like how it was in the 80’s, we were brought back and given a harsh reminder of the direct results of the pandemic and collapse of the economy. Where there was so much life end energy flowing through and around every shop and restaurant is now vacant.

Downtown as Text

Phot by Victoria Jackson/ CC By 4.0

“A Paradox”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT DOWNTOWN, 4 OCTOBER 2020

While it contains a beautiful mixture of cultures that has existed for years, Downtown Miami is no stranger to the inequality, prejudice and racism that was once ran widespread and unrestrained. The remnants and long-lasting effects can be still be seen throughout the area.

One of the places that we visited was the Miami Dade County Courthouse. A building that is supposed to endorse and represent justice and impartiality but is actually a constant reminder of the discrimination against individuals who lived here long ago. When approaching the front of the building people are greeted by a statue of Henry Flagler who helped make Miami what it is today but also utilized and then discarded and segregated individuals when they were no longer useful just because of the color of their skin. While we cannot ignore the great benefactions that Flagler provided for the development of Miami, to remain unknowledgeable about the history would be a big dishonor and disservice to the many hands who also had an important role in building the Miami that we love.

 People are also greeted by a plaque adorning the wall at the front that uses the derogatory term “negroes” to refer to some of its citizens. Greeted by its looming and intimidating structure the courthouse can already make someone who is going there unnerved, but having the statue and plaque placed proudly at the front of the building can deter anyone looking for a fighting chance. This building was built on and continues to highlight its own contradicting message of equality and representation of the innocent.

Our present system illuminates and prides itself on being a free, diverse, and progressive land that caters to its citizens and provides them with opportunity, chance, and justice. This blinding message truly blinds some into thinking that no effects of the past are present today when that is not the case. Just walking through the neighborhood, you could see such a stark contrast in the livelihood of its citizens. Many homeless people, predominantly people of color, roam the streets passing by established buildings. The wounds are still present. Yes, they have healed for those who have been privileged and provided with opportunity but for others the wounds are still raw and serve as a constant everyday reminder. These things need to be addressed and changed.

Chicken Key as Text

Photo by Victoria Jackson/ CC By 4.0

“A Veiled, Harsh Truth”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT CHICKEN KEY, 18 OCTOBER 2020

Exploring Chicken Key was truly an experience I would not change for the world. Visiting the small island in Biscayne Bay off the coast of Miami Dade County was an experience unlike anything I have done before. While throughout day we had some challenging moments that we had to work through, what we were able to accomplish as a class was truly amazing.

Along with the bustling schools of fish and the scuttling hermit crabs that greeted us as we parked our canoes and made our way on the island we were also greeted by the harsh reality of our actions. Pieces of glass, rope and strings, sections of shoes and other discarded objects littered the floor. As we explored and went deeper into the heart of the island the waste was not only becoming larger but was also becoming more prominent.

Looking at all of our canoes steadily pile up with trash saddened and angered me because I know that this land is an exceedingly small reflection of the many polluted areas across our planet. Just viewing the island at face value, it would be hard to believe that behind the scenic beauty would lie so much trash and waste. It makes me wonder why as a society we do not do more and push the conservation conversation to the forefront.

As we paddled away from the island it was a very bittersweet time. While we were not able to collect everything, we did feel good that we were able to make a dent in the growing mound of trash. The whole experience was extra special because it was our first time being together as a whole class. Though we were going to be separated again during our next meeting, we could hold onto this precious moment and use it influence our future choices.

Bakehouse as Text

Photo By Victoria Jackson/ CC By 4.0

“An Intersecting Medium”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT THE BAKEHOUSE ART COMPLEX, 1 NOVEMBER 2020

Art is able to transcend so many barriers and serve as an amazing language of its own that has the ability to spread messages, prompt feelings, and evoke emotions. Visiting the Bakehouse Art Complex in Wynwood served as an important reminder that individual efforts can lead to an increasing and powerful collective.

The arts have been a passion of mine from since I was smaller, specifically in dance. I loved being able to shape and mold myself as part of an ensemble to visually represent a bigger picture. While I have always held great admiration for art, I have not been given many opportunities to utilize it as a form, so getting a chance to explore the same concept through a different medium was extremely exciting.

Using a silicon-based stencil to create clay models, in a variety of colors and shapes, we were able to create, form and display a representation of the continuous problems happening to coral reefs due to climate change. Lauren Shapiro, the principal artist, does an amazing job of blending science, art, and technology to generate and produce more environmental awareness within our community and create a platform for additional information to be spread by scientists and researchers.

This was a wonderful representation of how the smallest contribution could affect the overall picture. From many different conversations I have had had with my peers, a lot of them wonder and have some degree of disbelief regarding how much of their individual effort could make a difference. It is so important to know that the little things that we do everyday can have a large impact. With amazing projects like this we were not only able to feel accomplished working as a group to help and exhibit a powerful message, but it also made us mindful of doing our own parts as we go forward.

Rubell as Text

Photo by Ahdriana Amandi/ CC By 4.0

“Comfort in the Uncomfortable”

BY VICTORIA JACKSON OF FIU AT THE RUBELL MUSEUM, 22 November 2020

The Rubell Art Museum is an amazing space that leaves the floor open to many hidden as well as upcoming artists to display their messages and ideas. Though I was not able to able to be there physically, I could sense the amount of feelings and emotions it prompted from my classmates while discussing the trip with them.

The museum is home to pieces by artists from all around the world spanning different eras. The artists they chose to shine a light on are overlooked and on the rise thus providing them with a larger audience to display and promote their amalgam of thoughts and ideas. Leaving their art up for interpretation while also demonstrating different things in our current society. Making visitors think beyond normal confines and venturing into topics that some people may view as unconventional and unorthodox.

Viewing the different pieces elicited such a powerful response from me. A piece by Mickalene Thomas called Mama Bush ll, Keep the Home Fires Burnin’, really stuck out to me. The piece depicts a woman who is naked and completely owning her own. There is such a push for women to step away from the roles that have been set for them and to embrace themselves but if people were to look at a painting like this, they would refer to it as too revealing, and it would serve as a tendentious topic. A picture like this would be over-sexualized instead of focusing on the empowerment of the individual. This serves as a great reminder that as a society we still have so far to go to get to the point where a woman is not put into a biased and prejudiced category based on their race and approach of sexuality.

Changing perspectives, morphing ideology and an abundant number of stories and experiences opens the floor to visitors to question the way they think. Opening up important conversations that need to be held and challenging them to deliberate. I hope in the future I am able to go visit so that I can fully immerse myself into this collective, open, inspiring, and free-thinking space. To look and take in the different textures, angles, lightings and see how they contribute to the larger narratives. To ask myself questions and to challenge my way of thinking.

One thought on “Victoria Jackson: Miami as Text”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s